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c# has static constructor which do some initialization. (Likely Do some unmanaged resource initialization) I am wondering if there is static destuctor?

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+1 for this funny comment, leppie. And I would like to point out that static resources have mostly the same lifetime as the the application. They die when application dies. So, there is no need of a static destructor. –  decyclone Dec 6 '10 at 9:37
    
"so there is no need of a static destructor" -- how are those two things related? Because it would only happen when the appdomain is being unloaded it's suddenly not necessary? I'm not sure I follow the logic there. –  BrainSlugs83 Nov 28 '13 at 3:11

6 Answers 6

up vote 19 down vote accepted

No, there isn't.

A static destructor supposedly would run at the end of execution of a process. When a process dies, all memory/handles associated with it will get released by the operating system.

If your program should do a specific action at the end of execution (like a transactional database engine, flushing its cache), it's going to be far more difficult to correctly handle than just a piece of code that runs at the end of normal execution of the process. You have to manually handle crashes and unexpected termination of the process and try recovering at next run anyway. The "static destructor" concept wouldn't help that much.

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In my case, I was using a OS-wide Mutex that needed released, or it would throw an AbandonedMutexException on the next run of the application. In this case, the memory and handles released at the end of the program didn't account for my Mutex. What you stated in the 3rd paragraph could be a way to manage it, but an end of the application release seemed to make more sense for me. –  user1132959 Jul 15 at 14:20

Not exactly a destructor, but here is how you would do it:

class StaticClass 
{
   static StaticClass() {
       AppDomain.CurrentDomain.ProcessExit +=
           StaticClass_Dtor;
   }

   static void StaticClass_Dtor(object sender, EventArgs e) {
        // clean it up
   }
}
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perfect. Works for me. –  Mark Lakata Nov 16 '12 at 23:24

This is the best way (ref: http://stackoverflow.com/a/256278/372666)

public static class Foo
{
    private static readonly Destructor Finalise = new Destructor();

    static Foo()
    {
        // One time only constructor.
    }

    private sealed class Destructor
    {
        ~Destructor()
        {
            // One time only destructor.
        }
    }
}
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This way is guaranteed to work! :) Give it a go, I have unit tests that prove that it works if anyone is interested? –  Tod Thomson Oct 30 '13 at 3:19

No, there isn't. The closest thing you can do is set an event handler to the DomainUnload event on the AppDomain and perform your cleanup there.

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Initializing and cleaning up unmanaged resources from a Static implementation is quite problematic and prone to issues.

Why not use a singleton, and implement a Finalizer for the instance (an ideally inherit from SafeHandle)

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No there is nothing like destructor for static classes but you can use Appdomain.Unloaded event if you really need to do something

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