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I have FFT result, this is 2 double array, real part array and imaginary part array. How to get frequency at each element in this arrays? I would like have frequency array from this result. And I also want to get the peak frequency from this result.

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I do it in C#.net. Can you help me? –  user532017 Dec 6 '10 at 17:55
6  
If you don't understand the relevance of the real and imaginary parts of an FFT then you aren't going to get any meaningful results, so you should hunt out some FFT and signal processing tutorials to understand how to interpret the results. I think it's quite likely that whatever you're using it for, you are wanting the magnitude of the FFT or the Power Spectral Density. –  the_mandrill Dec 6 '10 at 23:28
    
Thank you! I want to get peak frequencies of each frame (frame length depend in Window Length and Shift Length) –  user532017 Dec 7 '10 at 3:45

5 Answers 5

The first bin in the FFT is DC (0 Hz), the second bin is Fs / N, where Fs is the sample rate and N is the size of the FFT. The next bin is 2 * Fs / N. To express this in general terms, the nth bin is n * Fs / N.

So if your sample rate, Fs is say 44.1 kHz and your FFT size, N is 1024, then the FFT output bins are at:

  0:   0 * 44100 / 1024 =     0.0 Hz
  1:   1 * 44100 / 1024 =    43.1 Hz
  2:   2 * 44100 / 1024 =    86.1 Hz
  3:   3 * 44100 / 1024 =   129.2 Hz
  4: ...
  5: ...
     ...
511: 511 * 44100 / 1024 = 22006.9 Hz

Note that for a real input signal (imaginary parts all zero) the second half of the FFT (bins from N / 2 + 1 to N - 1) contain no useful additional information (they have complex conjugate symmetry with the first N / 2 - 1 bins). The last useful bin (for practical aplications) is at N / 2 - 1, which corresponds to 22006.9 Hz in the above example. The bin at N / 2 represents energy at the Nyquist frequency, i.e. Fs / 2 ( = 22050 Hz in this example), but this is in general not of any practical use, since anti-aliasing filters will typically attenuate any signals at and above Fs / 2.

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Ah, if I get sqrt(realreal + imaginaryimaginary) on each of those complex numbers(real and imaginary parts of result), should it return the frequency (Hz)? –  user532017 Dec 7 '10 at 3:30
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Note -- the answer is slightly wrong -- the 512th bucket contains the level for 22050, the nyquist limit. The bins 0 to N/2 inclusive contain useful values. –  david van brink Aug 19 '12 at 20:31
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Thanks for the edit & clarification... I guess this is where I reveal some lack of practicality. Me: But master, FFT's work up to the nyquist! You: Padawan, you really should filter that out. –  david van brink Aug 22 '12 at 0:16
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Okay, this helped me understand what I was doing wrong with my FFT code. I was taking all the bins as valid data thinking it was useful. I was also reading past the end of the memory buffer as KISS FFT only returns the bottom half anyway? This also helped me understand the frequency spectrum better. –  Demolishun Dec 18 '12 at 19:05
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I wish I could star answers. This answer is even better than the original question! –  Skylion Sep 14 '13 at 2:26

Take a look at my answer here.

Answer to comment:

The FFT actually calculates the cross-correlation of the input signal with sine and cosine functions (basis functions) at a range of equally spaced frequencies. For a given FFT output, there is a corresponding frequency (F) as given by the answer I posted. The real part of the output sample is the cross-correlation of the input signal with cos(2*pi*F*t) and the imaginary part is the cross-correlation of the input signal with sin(2*pi*F*t). The reason the input signal is correlated with sin and cos functions is to account for phase differences between the input signal and basis functions.

By taking the magnitude of the complex FFT output, you get a measure of how well the input signal correlates with sinusoids at a set of frequencies regardless of the input signal phase. If you are just analyzing frequency content of a signal, you will almost always take the magnitude or magnitude squared of the complex output of the FFT.

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The real and Imaginary part are FFT's result that used for? Please explain for me. Thank you –  user532017 Dec 6 '10 at 17:59
    
see my updated answer. –  Jason B Dec 6 '10 at 19:12
    
Thank for your's explain. –  user532017 Dec 8 '10 at 2:20
    
this answer deserves more love. –  Trevor Alexander Dec 6 '13 at 13:06

i use:

public static double Index2Freq(int i, double samples, int nFFT) {
  return (double) i * (samples / nFFT / 2.);
}

public static int Freq2Index(double freq, double samples, int nFFT) {
  return (int) (freq / (samples / nFFT / 2.0));
}

samples: sample rate, i.e. 8000, 44100, etc nFFT: number of items in the FFT vector

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People cannot exactly know what you represent with samples or nFFT. So please make it more explanatory. –  mostar Aug 20 '12 at 16:16
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The accepted answer says this should be i * samples / nFFT. Why is the extra 2 there? Am I missing something? –  yati sagade May 14 at 9:38

The fft output coefficients (for complex input of size N) are from 0 to N - 1 grouped as [LOW,MID,HI,HI,MID,LOW] frequency. I would consider that the element at k has the same frequency as the element at N-k since for real data, FFT[N-k] = complex conjugate of FFT[k].

The order of scanning from LOW to HIGH frequency is

0,

1, N-1,

2, N-2

...

[N/2] - 1, N - ([N/2] - 1) = [N/2]+1,

[N/2]

There are [N/2]+1 groups of frequency from index i = 0 to [N/2], each having the frequency " = i * SamplingFrequency / N "

So frequency at bin FFT[k] is :

if k <= [N/2] then k * SamplingFrequency / N
if k >= [N/2] then (N-k) * SamplingFrequency / N
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you kth fft results's frequency is 2*pi*k/N

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I guess this will be in radians –  Barnaby Aug 11 at 20:54

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