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Let's say we have a property as below

public string SomeProperty
{
    get
    {
        var propName = "SomeProperty";
        return "<" + propName + ">";
    }
}

How can I set value of the above variable propName to be the property name by reading from the assembly information itself?

Edit

Why we need this?

I'm using the WPF d:DataContext as mentioned in here which will help me to display a 'design-mode' value for bound properties - very often, the bound values are displayed as empty string in design mode. And in the 'design-mode' data-context class, I want to return the property name for every binding properties I may have.

Hope this would explain your concerns.

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Fox32, Jehof, 0x499602D2, tkanzakic Apr 28 '13 at 13:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
Please clarify where you'd want to do that. –  Jon Skeet Dec 6 '10 at 9:29
    
and why are you doing this ? is there any specific requirement –  Saurabh Dec 6 '10 at 9:29
1  
So you want to make a property, that returns it's own name? –  Øyvind Bråthen Dec 6 '10 at 9:30
    
You are on the wrong direction, I'm afraid. Please tell us your initial requirement if possible. –  Danny Chen Dec 6 '10 at 9:47
    
@Every one: Hi, I have updated my question to explain why I need it; it's about showing the bound property names in design-mode in VS2010 IDE –  Nam G VU Dec 7 '10 at 1:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

After a while I figure out a solution as below, which is quite convenient to me.

    string SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
            return GetDesignModeValue(() => this.SomeProperty);
        }
    }

    string GetDesignModeValue<T>(Expression<Func<T>> propertyExpression)
    {
        var propName = (propertyExpression.Body as MemberExpression).Member.Name;
        var value = string.Format(
            "<{0}>"
            , propName);
        return value;
    }

So, from now on, it is much much easier for us to show the binding properties' mocking value when in design mode.

I hope you would find it helpful somedays!

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10x, works perfectly. –  mynkow Jan 13 '12 at 15:31

There isn't a reliable way for doing that at runtime, but you can use MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name and throw away the first four characters.

This approach has some flaws: running the binary through an obfuscation tool may cause the method to get renamed. Additionally, the method may be inlined and cause problems (if you just use Remove on the string without checking the length, it may even cause unexpected crashes in the Release build that can be difficult to reproduce in Debug mode).

If your code follows a pattern and you need to generate a bunch of properties like that, it's better to use a compile-time approach like a code generator or an aspect-oriented programming framework.

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this should also work BUT i am not sure why you require this

public string SomeProperty
    {
        get
        {
            StackTrace st = new StackTrace();
            StackFrame[] fr = st.GetFrames();
            if (fr != null)
            {
                var propName = fr[0].GetMethod().Name.Substring(3, fr[0].GetMethod().Name.Length);
                return "<" + propName + ">";
            }

            return "SomeProperty";

        }
    } 
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I have update my question to explain why I need this. Thank you Saurabh –  Nam G VU Dec 7 '10 at 6:28

It's possible to pass the name of the property to the getter.

if MyObj is the object and if PropName is the variable holding the name of the property, then the following code is doing the job:

eval("Object.defineProperty(MyObj, PropName, { " + 
     "get : function() { return(\"the prop name is " + PropName + "\"); } });");
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