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How do I transform a Ruby Hash that looks like this:

{ 
  :axis => [1,2], 
  :"coord.x" => [12,13], 
  :"coord.y" => [14,15], 
}

Into this:

{
  :axis => [1,2], #unchaged from input (ok)
  :coord => #this has become a hash from coord.x and coord.y keys above
  { 
    :x => [12,13]
    :y => [14,15]
  }
}

I have no idea where to start!

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As for the books, my recommendations are: manning.com/black2 - The Well-Grounded Rubyist and pragprog.com/titles/ppmetr/metaprogramming-ruby - Metaprogramming Ruby –  Ernest Dec 6 '10 at 11:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This code may need to be refactored but it works for the input you have given.

hash = { 
  :axis => [1,2], 
  "coord.x" => [12,13], 
  "coord.y" => [14,15], 
}

new_hash = {}
hash.each do |key, val|
  new_key, new_sub_key = key.to_s.split('.')
  new_key = new_key.to_sym
  unless new_sub_key.nil?
    new_sub_key = new_sub_key.to_sym
    new_hash[new_key] = {} if new_hash[new_key].nil?
    new_hash[new_key].merge!({new_sub_key => val})
  else
    new_hash.store(key, val)
  end
end

new_hash # => {:axis=>[1, 2], :coord=>{:x=>[12, 13], :y=>[14, 15]}}
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Nice, thanks! But how does it work? Could you guide me to some good Ruby book(s) that will help me learn things like this? –  Zabba Dec 6 '10 at 10:06
    
If you want to master ruby, I would say concentrate on the object model of Ruby. "The Ruby Way" book is nice and thorough. I'm afraid shorter books won't give you deep insights into Ruby. As far this code is concerned, this basically iterates through each key-value pair in the hash, splits the key into 2 with dot (.) as a pivot and constructs the new has with the split strings as key and sub key respectively. Its pretty straight forward actually, if you know [Ruby Hash][ruby-doc.org/core/classes/Hash.html] –  Chirantan Dec 6 '10 at 10:07

The great thing about Ruby is that you can do things in different ways. Here is another (but as I measured - slightly slower, although this depends on the hash size) method:

hash = {
  :axis => [1,2],
  "coord.x" => [12,13],
  "coord.y" => [14,15],
}

new_hash = Hash.new { |hash, key| hash[key] = {} }

hash.each do |key, value|
  if key.respond_to? :split
    key.split('.').each_slice(2) do |new_key, sub_key|
      new_hash[new_key.to_sym].store(sub_key.to_sym, value)
    end
    next
  end
  new_hash[key] = value
end

puts new_hash # => {:axis=>[1, 2], :coord=>{:x=>[12, 13], :y=>[14, 15]}}

But, at least for me, it is easier and quicker to understand what is going on. So this is personal thing.

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Thanks! I will try and understand your answer :) –  Zabba Dec 6 '10 at 11:40

In the spirit of modularity and reusability, I propose an alternative solution. On a first approach we could have written a go-backwards hash constructor:

input_hash.map do |main_key, main_value|
  main_key.to_s.split(".").reverse.inject(main_value) do |value, key|
    {key.to_sym => value}
  end
end

# [{:coord=>{:x=>[12, 13]}}, {:coord=>{:y=>[14, 15]}}, {:axis=>[1, 2]}]

Not quite what you wanted, but pretty close. Only if Ruby had a recursive merge for hashes we'd be done. Ruby has no such method, but no doubt other people has needed it and written some solutions. Pick the implementation you like the most and now simply write:

input_hash.map do |main_key, main_value|
  main_key.to_s.split(".").reverse.inject(main_value) do |value, key|
    {key.to_sym => value}
  end
end.inject(&:deep_merge)

# {:coord=>{:y=>[14, 15], :x=>[12, 13]}, :axis=>[1, 2]}
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Trying to understand that almost melted my brain :) Very nice though... (I tried to do that before actual variables rename :P) –  Ernest Dec 6 '10 at 12:47
    
@c64ification: I hope the variable rename made it clearer :-) I was re-using "key" and also put a weird short name for "value", I think that's better. If you are not familiarized with Enumerable#inject (the old "foldl" of functional programming) it may look impenetrable, but in essence it's quite simple. –  tokland Dec 6 '10 at 13:06
    
yes the rename made it much cleaner. I am still fresh to Ruby, so I need a while (or otherwise - a lot of coffee) to bootstrap my brain into Ruby mode :) –  Ernest Dec 6 '10 at 13:12

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