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In an attempt to get more familiar with cookies I've decided to set up a simple cookie management system to have more control of the information that I can store and retrieve from a user.

The idea is to set a cookie if it does not exist, and update a cookie if it already exists on the user.

Once the cookie is set, it will also be stored in a database that will keep track on when the session started and when it was last accessed.

Creating a cookie worked well at first. But suddenly it stopped working and wouldn't set anything at all. This is the current code of the createSession() function:

function createSession() {

// check to see if cookie exists
if(isset($_COOKIE["test"])) {
            // update time
    $expire = time()+81400;
    setcookie("test","$cookiekey",$expire,"/",false,0);
} else {
    // assign unique cookie id
    list($msec,$sec)=explode(" ",microtime());
    $cookiekey = preg_replace("/./","",($msec+$sec));
            // set time
    $expire = time()+81400;

    // set cookie
    setcookie("test","$cookiekey",$expire,"/",false,0);

    // assign the unqiue id to $_COOKIE[]
    $_COOKIE["test"]=$cookiekey;
    unset($cookiekey);unset($msec);unset($sec);unset($expire);
   }

}

Is my approach heading in the right direction or have I done something way wrong?

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you are actually creating a cookie with name name and checking with the $_COOKIE["test"] –  Framework Dec 6 '10 at 10:29
    
*Changed it, but there is still no cookie detected by the browser –  chad Dec 6 '10 at 10:42

4 Answers 4

Doing $_COOKIE["test"] = something; doesn't make a "test" cookie. You need to use setcookie again.

I don't know why you'd want to do that though. Why not just check for $_COOKIE["name"] (the cookie that you are making).

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The idea is to assign the 'microtime id' to the cookie so that I can print it along with other cookie information later on. –  chad Dec 6 '10 at 10:44

Cookies are only available once another request was done. So don’t modify $_COOKIE on your own.

Furthermore, when in your case the cookie exists (i.e. $_COOKIE['test'] is set) you call setcookie again with $cookiekey as its value. But $cookiekey is not defined at that moment so the cookie will be overwritten with an empty string. I guess you want to use $_COOKIE['test'] instead:

if (isset($_COOKIE["test"])) {
    // update time
    $expire = time()+81400;
    setcookie("test", $_COOKIE["test"], $expire, "/", false, 0);
}
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You could also save yourself all that pain by using PHP's built in session management (examples here) to handle all of this cookie stuff for you.

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I merely try to learn by doing. Great example by the way, I'll dive into it. –  chad Dec 6 '10 at 10:48
    
$_SESSION is extremely nice and helpful, and based on cookies, so learning how to play around with cookies is essential to use $_SESSION. –  Yannis May 23 '11 at 16:29
1  
Learning how to play around with cookies is not required for using session at all; the session management takes care of that for you automatically. –  El Yobo May 23 '11 at 22:05
setcookie("test","$cookiekey",$expire,"/",false,0);

you are setting the cookie value as "$cookiekey", which is probably not what you want, as what you're saying is that the value is the string "$cookiekey" (actually if you have notices on, this should produce a php notice saying something like "Notice: Undefined variable: $cookiekey". What you want to do is:

setcookie("test", $cookiekey);

and of course as Gumbo pointed out you have to make sure $cookiekey is defined when needed (namely in your if block).

also the httponly (last) param should be boolean (in your case false). Not really important, but since you're learning...

$_COOKIE["test"]=$cookiekey;

as Jordi and Gumbo pointed out, this does nothing useful. setcookie adds the cookie in the http headers sent with your script, which is what you want. $_COOKIE is php's friendly way of retrieving cookies, not setting them.

$cookiekey = preg_replace("/./","",($msec+$sec));

I really don't get the $msec + $sec thing. If you are trying to get microtime as a float you can do: $cookiekey = microtime(true);

unset($cookiekey);unset($msec);unset($sec);unset($expire);

Not a mistake, but completely unnecessary. These variables will die on their own when no longer needed.

A simpler way to write your script would be:

<?php
function createSession() {

    if(isset($_COOKIE["test"])) {
        $cookiekey = $_COOKIE["test"];
    } else {
        $cookiekey = microtime(true);
    }

    $expires = time() + 81400;

    return setcookie("test", $cookiekey, $expires);
}

?>
  • The only thing that changes if the cookie exists or not is $cookiekey, so setcookie doesn't have to be in the if / else block
  • apart from name, value, expires you call setcookie with default params, no need to actually write them
  • a function should always have a return value, in this case the sensible think is the bool return of setcookie (or perhaps the $cookiekey?)

If you're looking for a little bit more confusion, check out my very simple and almost totally undocumented cookie library. (shameless plug)

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