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Consider:

$a = 'How are you?';

if ($a contains 'are')
    echo 'true';

Suppose I have the code above, what is the correct way to write the statement if ($a contains 'are')?

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2  
Also check out my PHP Library: github.com/heinkasner/PHP-Library.git –  heinkasner Jul 24 at 13:28

19 Answers 19

up vote 1624 down vote accepted

You can use the strpos function which is used to find the occurrence of one string inside other:

if (strpos($a,'are') !== false) {
    echo 'true';
}

Note that the use of !== false is deliberate; strpos returns either the offset at which the needle string begins in the haystack string, or the boolean false if the needle isn't found. Since 0 is a valid offset and 0 is "falsey", we can't use simpler constructs like !strpos($a, 'are').

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53  
one thing I found was that if "are" is the first word, then the above code will fail because it returns "0" which can be considered false! To avoid this it should read if(strpos("x".$a,'are') !== false) ..... –  Darknight Aug 16 '11 at 16:05
181  
@Darknight: "0" is not considered "false" when you use !==. It is only considered if you use !=. –  Milan Babuškov Oct 16 '11 at 9:12
63  
Very late to the party, but be careful with this. This will also return true for the string 'Do you care?' –  DTest Sep 28 '12 at 0:01
35  
@DTest - well yes of course it will return true because the string contains 'are'. If you are looking specifically for the word ARE then you would need to do more checks like, for example, check if there is a character or a space before the A and after the E. –  jsherk Nov 14 '12 at 21:35
10  
Very good comments above! I never use != or ==, after all !== and === is best option (in my opinion) all aspect considered (speed, accuracy etc). –  Melsi Dec 15 '12 at 12:28

Use strpos function:

if (strpos($a, 'are') !== false)
    echo 'true';
share|improve this answer

You could use regular expressions. It would look something like this:

$a = 'How are you?';

if (preg_match('/are/',$a))
    echo 'true';

Don't tell me it's bad just because you've heard it's bad before. You might if you have any facts to back it up though ;)

On the performance side, strpos is about three times faster and have in mind, when I did one million compares at once, it took preg match 1.5 seconds to finish and for strpos it took 0.5 seconds. What I'm trying to say is that it runs really fast either way. If you don't have 100,000 visitors every second, you shouldn't concern yourself with this kind of stuff and take what's most comfortable, IMO.

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40  
-1. it is a bad practice to use regular expressions in the simple string checking. –  plutov.by Dec 6 '10 at 13:26
4  
thanks for the suggestion, your code works great, but I prefer to use strpos function. –  Charles Yeung Dec 6 '10 at 13:26
5  
@Alexander.Plutov second of all you're giving me a -1 and not the question ? cmon it takes 2 seconds to google the answer google.com/… –  Breezer Dec 6 '10 at 14:03
20  
+1 Its a horrible way to search for a simple string, but many visitors to SO are looking for any way to search for any of their own substrings, and it is helpful that the suggestion has been brought up. Even the OP might have oversimplified - let him know of his alternatives. –  SamGoody Nov 9 '11 at 9:53
15  
Technically, the question asks how to find words not a substring. This actually helped me as I can use this with regex word boundries. Alternatives are always useful. –  Lego Stormtroopr Aug 20 '13 at 5:57

Here is a little utility function that is useful in situations like this

// returns true if $needle is a substring of $haystack
function contains($needle, $haystack)
{
    return strpos($haystack, $needle) !== false;
}
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4  
-1 since a utility function like this doesn't add any value or functionality. –  Robin van Baalen Feb 1 '13 at 19:45
10  
@RobinvanBaalen Actually, it can improves code readability. Also, downvotes are supposed to be for (very) bad answers, not for "neutral" ones. –  Xaqq Jul 9 '13 at 8:56
4  
@RobinvanBaalen functions are nearly by definition for readability (to communicate the idea of what you're doing). Compare which is more readable: if ($email->contains("@") && $email->endsWith(".com)) { ... or if (strpos($email, "@") !== false && substr($email, -strlen(".com")) == ".com") { ... –  Brandin Jul 25 '13 at 12:12
2  
@RobinvanBaalen in the end rules are meant to be broken. Otherwise people wouldn't come up with newer inventive ways of doing things :) . Plus have to admit I have trouble wrapping the mind around stuff like on martinfowler.com. Guess the right thing to do is to try things out yourself and find out what approaches are the most convenient. –  James Poulson Aug 22 '13 at 1:43
2  
Improves code readability –  Steve Cooke Apr 25 at 22:17

To determine whether a string contains another string you can use the PHP function strpos().

int strpos ( string $haystack , mixed $needle [, int $offset = 0 ] )

<?php

$haystack = 'how are you';
$needle = 'are'

if (strpos($haystack,$needle) !== false) {
    echo '$haystack contains $needle';
}

?>

CAUTION:

If the needle you are searching for is at the beginning of the haystack it will return position 0, if you do a == compare that will not work, you will need to do a ===

A == sign is a comparison and tests whether the variable / expression / constant to the left has the same value as the variable / expression / constant to the right.

A === sign is a comparison to see whether two variables / expresions / constants are equal AND have the same type - i.e. both are strings or both are integers.

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1  
quote source? maxi-pedia.com/string+contains+substring+PHP –  btk Dec 19 '10 at 23:39
    
great, thanks for the words of warning. Ill keep this in mind. –  AnojiRox Nov 9 '12 at 20:52
    
+1 for == compare that will not work, you will need to do a === –  Amol M Kulkarni Sep 4 at 6:41

Using strstr() or stristr() if your search should be case insensitive would be another option.

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A note on the php.net/manual/en/function.strstr.php page: Note: If you only want to determine if a particular needle occurs within haystack, use the faster and less memory intensive function strpos() instead. –  tastro Feb 8 at 17:49
    
@tastro Are there any reputable benchmarks on this? –  Wayne Whitty Jun 17 at 10:26
    
Not that i know of... I just saw it there. :/ –  tastro Jun 18 at 13:18

Look at strpos():

<?php
    $mystring = 'abc';
    $findme   = 'a';
    $pos = strpos($mystring, $findme);

    // Note our use of ===. Simply, == would not work as expected
    // because the position of 'a' was the 0th (first) character.
    if ($pos === false) {
        echo "The string '$findme' was not found in the string '$mystring'.";
    }
    else {
        echo "The string '$findme' was found in the string '$mystring',";
        echo " and exists at position $pos.";
    }
?>
share|improve this answer

Another option is to use the strstr() function. Something like:

if (strlen(strstr($haystack,$needle))>0) {
// Needle Found
}

Point to note: The strstr() function is case-sensitive. For a case-insensitive search, use the stristr() function.

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strstr() returns FALSE if the needle was not found. So a strlen is not necessary. –  Ayesh K Sep 11 '12 at 4:13

If you want to avoid the "falsey" and "truthy" problem, you can use substr_count:

if (substr_count($a, 'are') > 0) {
    echo "at least one 'are' is present!";
}

It's a bit slower than strpos but it avoids the comparison problems.

share|improve this answer

The function below also works and does not depend on any other function; it uses only native PHP string manipulation. Personally, I do not recommend this, but you can see how it works:

<?php

if (!function_exists('is_str_contain')) {
  function is_str_contain($string, $keyword)
  {
    if (empty($string) || empty($keyword)) return false;
    $keyword_first_char = $keyword[0];
    $keyword_length = strlen($keyword);
    $string_length = strlen($string);

    // case 1
    if ($string_length < $keyword_length) return false;

    // case 2
    if ($string_length == $keyword_length) {
      if ($string == $keyword) return true;
      else return false;
    }

    // case 3
    if ($keyword_length == 1) {
      for ($i = 0; $i < $string_length; $i++) {

        // Check if keyword's first char == string's first char
        if ($keyword_first_char == $string[$i]) {
          return true;
        }
      }
    }

    // case 4
    if ($keyword_length > 1) {
      for ($i = 0; $i < $string_length; $i++) {
        /*
        the remaining part of the string is equal or greater than the keyword
        */
        if (($string_length + 1 - $i) >= $keyword_length) {

          // Check if keyword's first char == string's first char
          if ($keyword_first_char == $string[$i]) {
            $match = 1;
            for ($j = 1; $j < $keyword_length; $j++) {
              if (($i + $j < $string_length) && $keyword[$j] == $string[$i + $j]) {
                $match++;
              }
              else {
                return false;
              }
            }

            if ($match == $keyword_length) {
              return true;
            }

            // end if first match found
          }

          // end if remaining part
        }
        else {
          return false;
        }

        // end for loop
      }

      // end case4
    }

    return false;
  }
}

Test:

var_dump(is_str_contain("test", "t")); //true
var_dump(is_str_contain("test", "")); //false
var_dump(is_str_contain("test", "test")); //true
var_dump(is_str_contain("test", "testa")); //flase
var_dump(is_str_contain("a----z", "a")); //true
var_dump(is_str_contain("a----z", "z")); //true 
var_dump(is_str_contain("mystringss", "strigngs")); //true 
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4  
Could you please tell me why in the world you would use a function like this, when strpos is a perfectly viable solution?... –  sg3s Sep 19 '13 at 14:05
1  
@sg3s: you are totally right, however, strpos also based on something like that, also, I didn't posted it for rep just for sharing a bit of knowledge –  Jason OOO Sep 19 '13 at 19:33

Make use of case-insensitve matching using stripos():

if (stripos($string,$stringToSearch) !== false) {
    echo 'true';
}
share|improve this answer
$a = 'how are you';
if (strpos($a,'are')) {
    echo 'true';
}
share|improve this answer
6  
What does that return if you look for 'how'? –  andrewsi Oct 9 '12 at 16:22
2  
Careful! Try strpos($a,'are') === FALSE instead. @andrewsi is right, looking for 'how' would break it. –  Joost Oct 9 '12 at 16:24
1  
@Joost Instead, check strpos($a,'are') === false. Same thing, but uppercase FALSE in PHP is a constant referencing the lowercase boolean false –  Robin van Baalen Dec 18 '12 at 18:53
    
Ah, thanks for the addition. You're quite correct! –  Joost Dec 18 '12 at 20:28
1  
+0 as even wrong answers might be helpful to others. –  Tino Feb 20 at 21:02
if( preg_match("are",$a) ) {
   echo "true";
}
share|improve this answer
    
that's right. better use "preg_match()" –  joan16v Oct 30 '13 at 16:10

I had some trouble with this, and finally I chose to create my own solution. Without using regular expression engine :

function contains($text, $word)
{
    $found = true;
    $spaceArray = explode(' ', $text);

    $nonBreakingSpaceArray = explode(chr(160), $text);

    if (in_array($word, $spaceArray) ||
        in_array($word, $nonBreakingSpaceArray)
       ) {

        $found = true;
    }
    return $found;
 }

You may notice that the solutions above are not an answer for the word being used as a prefix for another. In order to use your example:

$a = 'How are you?';
$b = "a skirt that flares from the waist";
$c = "are";

With the samples above, both $a and $b contains $c, but you may want your function to tell you that only $a contains $c.

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While most of these answers will tell you if a substring appears in your string, that's usually not what you want if you're looking for a particular word, and not a substring.

What's the difference? Substrings can appear within other words:

  • The "are" at the beginning of "area"
  • The "are" at the end of "hare"
  • The "are" in the middle of "fares"

One way to mitigate this would be to use a regular expression coupled with word boundaries (\b):

function containsWord($str, $word)
{
    return !!preg_match('#\b' . preg_quote($word, '#') . '\b#i', $str);
}

This method doesn't have the same false positives noted above, but it does have some edge cases of its own. Word boundaries match on non-word characters (\W), which are going to be anything that isn't a-z, A-Z, 0-9, or _. That means digits and underscores are going to be counted as word characters and scenarios like this will fail:

  • The "are" in "What _are_ you thinking?"
  • The "are" in "lol u dunno wut those are4?"

If you want anything more accurate than this, you'll have to start doing English language syntax parsing, and that's a pretty big can of worms (and assumes proper use of syntax, anyway, which isn't always a given).

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1  
this should be the canonical answer. Because we're looking for words and not substrings, regex is appropriate. I'll also add that \b matches two things that \W doesn't, which makes it great for finding words in a string: It matches beginning of string (^) and end of string ($) –  sean9999 Oct 12 at 2:09

Another option to finding occurrence of word from string using strstr() and stristr() like following

<?php
    $a = 'How are you?';
    if (strstr($a,'are'))  //case sensitive
        echo 'true';
    if (stristr($a,'are'))  //case insensitive
        echo 'true';    
?>
share|improve this answer
    
This is backwards. The i in stristr stands for insensitive. –  Adam Merrifield Apr 1 at 2:20

Do not use preg_match() if you only want to check if one string is contained in another string. Use strpos() or strstr() instead as they will be faster. (http://in2.php.net/preg_match)

if (strpos($text, 'string_name') !== false){
   echo 'get the string';
}
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As Charles stated in his answer, you need to use identical/not identical operators because strpos can return 0 as it's index value. If you like ternary operators, consider using the following (seems a little backwards I'll admit):

echo FALSE === strpos($a,'are') ? 'false': 'true';

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Peer to SamGoody and Lego Stormtroopr comments.

If you are looking for a php algorithm to rank search results based on proximity/relevance of multiple words here comes a quick and easy way of generating search results with PHP only:

Issues with the other boolean search methods sush as strpos(), preg_match(), strstr() or stristr()

  1. can't search for multiple words
  2. results are unranked

PHP method based on Vector Space Model and tf-idf (term frequency–inverse document frequency):

It sounds difficult but is surprisingly easy.

If we want to search for multiple words in a string the core problem is how we assign a weight to each one of them?

If we could weight the terms in a string based on how representative they are of the string as a whole, we could order our results by the ones that best match the query.

This is the idea of the vector space model, not far from how SQL fulltext search works:

function get_corpus_index($corpus = array(), $separator=' ') {

    $dictionary = array();

    $doc_count = array();

    foreach($corpus as $doc_id => $doc) {

        $terms = explode($separator, $doc);

        $doc_count[$doc_id] = count($terms);

        // tf–idf, short for term frequency–inverse document frequency, 
        // according to wikipedia is a numerical statistic that is intended to reflect 
        // how important a word is to a document in a corpus

        foreach($terms as $term) {

            if(!isset($dictionary[$term])) {

                $dictionary[$term] = array('document_frequency' => 0, 'postings' => array());
            }
            if(!isset($dictionary[$term]['postings'][$doc_id])) {

                $dictionary[$term]['document_frequency']++;

                $dictionary[$term]['postings'][$doc_id] = array('term_frequency' => 0);
            }

            $dictionary[$term]['postings'][$doc_id]['term_frequency']++;
        }

        //from http://phpir.com/simple-search-the-vector-space-model/

    }

    return array('doc_count' => $doc_count, 'dictionary' => $dictionary);
}

function get_similar_documents($query='', $corpus=array(), $separator=' '){

    $similar_documents=array();

    if($query!=''&&!empty($corpus)){

        $words=explode($separator,$query);

        $corpus=get_corpus_index($corpus, $separator);

        $doc_count=count($corpus['doc_count']);

        foreach($words as $word) {

            if(isset($corpus['dictionary'][$word])){

                $entry = $corpus['dictionary'][$word];


                foreach($entry['postings'] as $doc_id => $posting) {

                    //get term frequency–inverse document frequency
                    $score=$posting['term_frequency'] * log($doc_count + 1 / $entry['document_frequency'] + 1, 2);

                    if(isset($similar_documents[$doc_id])){

                        $similar_documents[$doc_id]+=$score;

                    }
                    else{

                        $similar_documents[$doc_id]=$score;

                    }
                }
            }
        }

        // length normalise
        foreach($similar_documents as $doc_id => $score) {

            $similar_documents[$doc_id] = $score/$corpus['doc_count'][$doc_id];

        }

        // sort fro  high to low

        arsort($similar_documents);

    }   

    return $similar_documents;
}

CASE 1

$query = 'are';

$corpus = array(
    1 => 'How are you?',
);

$match_results=get_similar_documents($query,$corpus);
echo '<pre>';
    print_r($match_results);
echo '</pre>';

RESULT

Array
(
    [1] => 0.52832083357372
)

CASE 2

$query = 'are';

$corpus = array(
    1 => 'how are you today?',
    2 => 'how do you do',
    3 => 'here you are! how are you? Are we done yet?'
);

$match_results=get_similar_documents($query,$corpus);
echo '<pre>';
    print_r($match_results);
echo '</pre>';

RESULTS

Array
(
    [1] => 0.54248125036058
    [3] => 0.21699250014423
)

CASE 3

$query = 'we are done';

$corpus = array(
    1 => 'how are you today?',
    2 => 'how do you do',
    3 => 'here you are! how are you? Are we done yet?'
);

$match_results=get_similar_documents($query,$corpus);
echo '<pre>';
    print_r($match_results);
echo '</pre>';

RESULTS

Array
(
    [3] => 0.6813781191217
    [1] => 0.54248125036058
)

There are plenty of improvements to be made but the model provides a way of getting good results from natural queries, which don't have boolean operators sush as strpos(), preg_match(), strstr() or stristr().

NOTA BENE

Optionally eliminating redundancy prior to search the words

  • thereby reducing index size and resulting in less storage requirement

  • less disk I/O

  • faster indexing and a consequently faster search.

1. Normalisation

  • Convert all text to lower case

2. Stop word elimination

  • Eliminate words from the text which carry no real meaning (like 'and', 'or', 'the', 'for', etc.)

3. Dictionary substitution

  • Replace words with others which have an identical or similar meaning. (ex:replace instances of 'hungrily' and 'hungry' with 'hunger')

  • Further algorithmic measures (snowball) may be performed to further reduce words to their essential meaning.

  • The replacement of colour names with their hexadecimal equivalents

  • The reduction of numeric values by reducing precision are other ways of normalising the text.

RESOURCES

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