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Given an input string:

<m>1</m>
<m>2</m>
<m>10</m>
<m>11</m>

I would like to replace all values that are not equal to 1 with 5.
So the output String should look like:

<m>1</m>
<m>5</m>
<m>5</m>
<m>5</m>

I tried using:

gsub(/(<m>)([^1])(<\/m>)/, '\15\3')

But this will not replace 10 and 11.

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I have to admit that I'm kind of curious why. –  Jonas Elfström Dec 6 '10 at 14:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

#gsub can optionally take a block and will replace with the result of that block:

subject.gsub(/\d+/) { |m| m == '1' ? m : '5' }
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Exactly what I was looking for. –  Martin Flucka Dec 7 '10 at 9:05
    
what I needed in the end was something like this: gsub(/(<m>)(\d+)(<\/m>)/) { | m1 | m1.gsub(/\d+/) { | m2 | if ['1', '2', '4'].include?(m2) m2 else '5' end } } –  Martin Flucka Dec 7 '10 at 9:41
    
If you're using Ruby 1.9 you can use the pattern /(?<=<m>)(\d+)(?=<\/m>)/ to simplify it. The (?<=...) and (?=...) are a lookbehind and a lookahead, and those won't be included in the matched string. –  Theo Dec 7 '10 at 10:13
1  
or you can use $1, $2 and $3 in the block and just ignore the parameter: subject.gsub(/(<m>)(\d+)(<\/m>)/) { |m| $1 + ($2 == '1' ? $2 : '5') + $3 } –  Theo Dec 7 '10 at 10:18

Without regexp just because it's possible

"1 2 10 11".split.map{|n| n=='1' ? n : '5'}.join(' ')
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+1 because regex is not the universal solution. –  the Tin Man Dec 6 '10 at 19:47
result = subject.gsub(/\b(?!1\b)\d+/, '5')

Explanation:

\b    # match at a word boundary (in this case, at the start of a number)
(?!   # assert that it's not possible to match
 1    # 1
 \b   # if followed by a word boundary (= end of the number)
)     # end of lookahead assertion
\d+   # match any (integer) number

Edit:

If you just wish to replace numbers that are surrounded by <m> and </m> then you can use

result = subject.gsub(/<m>(?!1\b)\d+<\/m>/, '<m>5</m>')
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