Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have just written some code, which as i was writing i thought, this is going to be a nice generic method for searching for a particular node. When i finished i actually realised it was a mess :D

public String sqlReading(String fileName, String path, String nodeId )
{
    XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
    doc.Load(fileName);

    XmlNodeList names = doc.SelectNodes(path);
    foreach (XmlNode xmlDocSearchTerm in names)
    {
        //if the attribute of the node i start at is the same as where i am now
        if (xmlDocSearchTerm.Attributes.Item(0).Value.ToString().Equals(nodeId))
        {
            //get a list of all of its child nodes
            XmlNodeList childNodes = xmlDocSearchTerm.ChildNodes;

            foreach (XmlNode node in childNodes)
            {
                //if there is a node in here called gui display, go inside
                if (node.Name.Equals("GUIDisplay"))
                {
                    XmlNodeList list = node.ChildNodes;
                    //find the sqlsearchstring tag inside of here
                    foreach (XmlNode finalNode in list)
                    {
                        if (finalNode.Name.Equals("sqlSearchString"))
                        {
                            return node.InnerText;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return "";
}

What i intended to do was based on a path - i would start and check to see if the element had the id i was looking for, if it did then i wanted to get inside there and not stop going until i got to the sqlsearchstring tag which was buried two levels deeper. I have managed that, but the issue here is that now i seem to have almost hardcoded a path to the tag opposed to looping there. How could i change my code to stop me from doing this?

Its from the second foreach where its going wrong imo.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
With XPath, I think you can replace all the foreach loops with a single line of code. –  Tim Robinson Dec 6 '10 at 14:24
2  
Are you looking for XPath? support.microsoft.com/kb/308333 –  dsolimano Dec 6 '10 at 14:24
    
Have you heard of XPath ? –  mjv Dec 6 '10 at 14:25
    
LOL... 3 comments that reference XPath, within 30 seconds... This XPath thing must be a fad ;-) Some kind of new buzz word ;-) –  mjv Dec 6 '10 at 14:26
    
ok i think xpath is the way to go lol! thank you –  tom Dec 6 '10 at 14:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Haven't tested it but I believe something like this would work, by using a xpath. However I'm not sure the name of the attribute, or is it always the first attribute?

public String sqlReading(String fileName, String path, String nodeId)
{
    XmlDocument doc = new XmlDocument();
    doc.Load(fileName);

    XmlNode foundNode = doc.SelectNodes(path).SelectSingleNode("*[@id='" + nodeId + "']/GUIDisplay/sqlSearchString");
    if (foundNode != null)
        return foundNode.InnerText;
    return string.Empty;

}
share|improve this answer
    
That should work if the name of targeted attribute is known (or also if we target any attribute, using "*[@*='"... ). However if the requirement is effectively to select the nodes which very first attribute has a value of nodeId irrespective of its name, one needs to express this predicate outside of XPath, either in C# (akin to foreach loop of OP) or in LINQ (akin to Dean Chalk's answer). In other words, while XPath offers predicates based on the position of a Node [within its siblings], I don't believe there is a way to specify the position of an attribute. –  mjv Dec 6 '10 at 15:21

Im not sure if this is exaclty right (as I dont have an XML document to try it with, but something similar should work

var innerTexts = XDocument.Load(fileName)
    .Elements(path)
    .Where(n => n.Attributes().ElementAt(0).Value == nodeId)
    .SelectMany(n => n.Elements())
    .Where(n => n.Name == "GUIDisplay")
    .SelectMany(n => n.Elements())
    .Where(n => n.Name == "sqlSearchString")
    .Select(n => n.ToString());
share|improve this answer

I would say recursion is a safe bet (for iterating through nested child nodes) Though, from what I gather, the structure remains the same. And with that in mind, why not use [XmlDocumentObj].SelectSingleNode("/[nodeId='"+nodeId+"']") (or some facsimile) instead? This has the ability to search by attribute name, unless the XML structure is always changed and you never have constant tag (in which case XPath is probably a good idea).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.