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I have a temp table and want to check in a where clause wether a certain id/string is contained in the temp table.

Select...
WHERE MyId  IN MyTempTable

I get a general error in MS SQL Management studio.

is the "In" operator not suited for temp tables?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Your syntax is wrong:

SELECT ...
  FROM MyTable
 WHERE MyID IN (SELECT MyID
                  FROM MyTempTable)

I don't much like the IN operator, so I prefer this:

SELECT ...
  FROM MyTable
 WHERE EXISTS (SELECT *
                 FROM MyTempTable
                WHERE MyTable.MyID = MyID)

But it's largely a matter of taste.

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+1 you're correct because generally it's better for NOT IN vs NOT EXISTS which are quite different. So why not use EXISTS consistently? INTERSECT works too. See my answer here please –  gbn Dec 6 '10 at 20:41
1  
@gbn: As I said, it is largely a matter of taste, but my reasons are more based on my understanding of the relational model than just consistency. Firstly, IN is a bit of a wart in the language that is strictly unnecessary; anything that can be expressed using (NOT) IN has an equivalent (NOT) EXISTS. But also, it is a semantic oddity that doesn't hark from either the relational algebra or the relational calculus. It was plonked in there by SQL's designers for reasons I can't fathom. It must have been a big deal, though, since it is apparently the reason for the S in SQL ("Structured"). –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 6 '10 at 21:48
    
NOT IN does not equal NOT EXISTS hence my comment. A NULL in the NOT IN list will give no results. Why is "IN "there? I guess when ANSI was put together they took IN from one of the then current SQL dialects –  gbn Dec 7 '10 at 8:42
    
@gbn: You are right, but I avoid nulls like the plague (atrocities like NOT IN ('a', 'b', 'c', NULL) being just one of many motivations), so I don't generally consider such scenarios in my thinking. Also, I wasn't referring to ANSI SQL, but the original design work that spawned those dialects. –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 7 '10 at 9:51
    
@Lisa: The obvious way. If you can't figure it out, post another question with whatever code you've tried. –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 7 '10 at 10:21

Your syntax is slightly wrong. You need to do:

SELECT ...
  FROM ...
 WHERE MyId IN (SELECT MyId 
                  FROM MyTempTable);
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in requires a list of specific items. Tables generally have more than one field, how is it to know which field you mean?

You can use a subquery, where field in (select whatever from #temp)

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