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Given the following two coding styles, please specify a rationale (some pros/cons) for why one would possibly be preferable over the other when writing C++ code.

( Please do not answer with "it is not important"; "just stick to one"; etc. The question is specifically about the possible pro/cons (if any) of the two spacing styles below. Thanks. )

// VARIANT A (NO space after control keyword / space before curly brace)
if(condition) {
  // ...
}
else if(c2) {
  // ...
}
else {
  // ...
}

for(int i=0; i<e; ++i) {
  // ...
}

...

// vs. VARIANT B (space after control keyword / NO space before curly brace)

if (condition){
  // ...
}
else if (c2){
  // ...
}
else{
  // ...
}

for (int i=0; i<e; ++i){
  // ...
}

...

Note: Apart from taste issues, I am asking this because I see both styles in our code-base and would try to get some arguments for which is to be preferred.

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2  
Shouldn't this be community wiki? –  unwind Dec 6 '10 at 15:41
    
@unwind Yes, it should. –  Maxpm Dec 6 '10 at 15:43
    
@unwind/maxpm: Why should this be community wiki? –  Martin Ba Dec 6 '10 at 15:43
3  
What makes you think there's a possible rationale, other than one based on taste or aesthetics? –  David Thornley Dec 6 '10 at 16:01
5  
I hate both. The curly braces don't align. –  Loki Astari Dec 6 '10 at 16:15
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7 Answers

I typically place spaces between all operators. It's just faster to parse visually. Perhaps if your eyesight is better than mine.

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Since this is probably much about habit and taste, it might be hard to get any concrete arguments for or against, but here's what I think:

Both works reasonably good, but how would it look to have spaces in function calls? like this:

len = strlen (somePtr);

That's at least one space too many in my opinion.

Not having spaces makes things look more like a control statement than a function call, and I think it is useful to make if/else/while/for stand out a bit.

But I realize this is a pretty subjective view. :)

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+1 - thanks for an argument covering the actual question –  Martin Ba Dec 7 '10 at 7:07
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A lot of people get very obsessed about where to place the spaces, braces, parenthesis, brackets, semi-colons and so on whilst at the same time forgetting that the most important thing about source code is that it needs to be understood by another human being.

The compiler couldn't care less about formatting.

After many years in the programming profession, I've come to use this one simple rule:

Is it easy to read and understand what the code is doing?

It doesn't matter how you format the code, if the above condition isn't met, the code is of poor quality.

I have a personal preference to formatting, and I won't say what it is here as it really doesn't matter what it is.

I find it useful having different programmers code in different styles.

There is of course an exception to this rule: Documentation and tutorial examples should always be consistent - you need to get the reader to follow the important elements being shown and not get sidetracked by the formatting.

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From your question, it seems as if you are aware that a lot of people will tell you that it doesn't matter. Given that you already know this, why do you insist that there must be some objective reason for using one style over the other?

If spacing is really the most important issue in your code base, your team must be the best team in the history of programming. If not, you should worry more about expressing the ideas clearly and if the software serves it's purpose.

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Not "a", "one" reason. But there should be some arguments either way. (Or not, in which case its all taste. But I do not think it is. There should always be some arguments (maybe weak ones) either way that are not purely based on taste.) –  Martin Ba Dec 7 '10 at 7:11
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With the advent of modern IDEs and automatic code formatting, this really is neither here nor there. And I wouldn't advice wholesale change of spaces (or any other formatting changes) for existing code in a vcs. Developers will tend to stick to the formatting they are familiar with and as long as the code relays the intention well, where a particular space is inserted is totally redundant IMHO. What you will most likely do is annoy people who are used to doing it one way by enforcing something that is contrived on them...

Focus on the programming problems, not the formatting...

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I personally prefer this style:

if( condition )
    oneLiner();
else if( complicatedCondition(someVar, otherVar) )
{
    more();
    than();
    oneLiner();
}
else if( otherCondition ) // I would prefer to put this in one if with '&&' between conditions...
{
    if( nestedCondition )
        oneLiner();
}
else
{
  // ...
}

for( int i = 0; i<e; ++i )
{
  // ... even for one-liner loops which occasionally might happen
}

Why?

  1. Braces are aligned
  2. No space wasted on oneliner ifs.
  3. Loops are clearly noted with braces (always)
  4. Only the outer level has spaces before or after the parentheses. Still a mess if there are more than three levels of function calling involved, like some( function(calling(another(function())) )
  5. a single space after a semicolon and comma for easy location of these types of delimiters.
  6. Nested ifs need braces around them.

This is of course purely personal, and any comments on my style will be ignored flagrantly ;-)

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That works OK I guess until some programmer updates it along the lines of oneLiner(); => if (another_condition) oneLiner (); and then things go a bit weird. –  Skizz Dec 16 '10 at 16:24
    
Then the nested if needs extra braces of course. Will edit to add that point. Mind you that a single extra condition can be put in the same if with &&. –  rubenvb Dec 18 '10 at 10:45
    
Well-argued, but I think this wastes vertical space, which makes reading code harder. (Just an subjective opinion of course.) –  Martin Ba Jan 27 '11 at 8:58
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I recently fixed some code where a single-line-if was modified and someone forgot to add some braces.

While reading the code, it seemed to me, that the style ...condition){ is harder to read that the style ...condition) { because the closing ) and opening { are easier to see when separated by a space. (When using Courier New on VS2005 - may be different with different fonts I guess.)

I would also argue that with if( the separation is pretty clear without any added whitespace, especially because in a modern editor the if will very likely be colored differently from the (, but { will likely have the same color.

Here's a short example:

if (pPointer && pPointer->condition(foobar)){
  SendEvent(success_foobar);
  Log(success_foobar);
}
if (pPointer && pPointer->condition(foo))
  SendEvent(success_foo);
  Log(success_foo);
if (pPointer && pPointer->condition(bar)){
  SendEvent(success_bar);
  Log(success_bar);
}

vs. this (which I think makes the missing brace a bit clearer):

if(pPointer && pPointer->condition(foobar)) {
  SendEvent(success_foobar);
  Log(success_foobar);
}
if(pPointer && pPointer->condition(foo))
  SendEvent(success_foo);
  Log(success_foo);
if(pPointer && pPointer->condition(bar)) {
  SendEvent(success_bar);
  Log(success_bar);
}

So to sum up one may argue that the visual distinction in modern editors is much bigger btw. if and ( so these do not need spaces, while ( and { are colored the same and are not as visually distinct and therefore a space may be in order.

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