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I'm writing a kernel module which uses a customized print-on-screen system. Basically each time a print is involved the string is inserted into a linked list. Every X seconds I need to process the list and perform some operations on the strings before printing them.

Basically I have two choices to implement such a filter:

1) Timer (which restarts itself in the end)

2) Kernel thread which sleeps for X seconds

While the filter is performing its stuff nothing else can use the linked list and, of course, while inserting a string the filter function shall wait.

AFAIK timer runs in interrupt context so it cannot sleep, but what about kernel threads? Can they sleep? If yes is there some reason for not to use them in my project? What other solution could be used?

To summarize: my filter function has got only 3 requirements:

1) Must be able to printk

2) When using the list everything else which is trying to access the list must block until the filter function finishes execution

3) Must run every X seconds (not a realtime requirement)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

kthreads are allowed to sleep. (However, not all kthreads offer sleepful execution to all clients. softirqd for example would not.) But then again, you could also use spinlocks (and their associated cost) and do without the extra thread (that's basically what the timer does, uses spinlock_bh). It's a tradeoff really.

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each time a print is involved the string is inserted into a linked list

I don't really know if you meant print or printk. But if you're talking about printk(), You would need to allocate memory and you are in trouble because printk() may be called in an atomic context. Which leaves you the option to use a circular buffer (and thus, you should be tolerent to drop some strings because you might not have enough memory to save all the strings).

Every X seconds I need to process the list and perform some operations on the strings before printing them.

In that case, I would not even do a kernel thread: I would do the processing in print() if not too costly.

Otherwise, I would create a new system call:

  • sys_get_strings() or something, that would dump the whole linked list into userspace (and remove entries from the list when copied).

This way the whole behavior is controlled by userspace. You could create a deamon that would call the syscall every X seconds. You could also do all the costly processing in userspace.

You could also create a new device says /dev/print-on-screen:

  • dev_open would allocate the memory, and print() would no longer be a no-op, but feed the data in the device pre-allocated memory (in case print() would be used in atomic context and all).
  • dev_release would throw everything out
  • dev_read would get you the strings
  • dev_write could do something on your print-on-screen system
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+1 for giving me the idea to use a user space solution –  Emiliano Dec 7 '10 at 10:10

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