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In a new piece of code I have several different classes that refer to each other. Something like this (this is not my actual situation but an example of something similar):

class BookManager
   {
   ...
   };

class Book
   {
   public:
      void setBookManager(BookManager *bookManager) {m_bookManager = bookManager;}
   private:
      BookManager *m_bookManager;
   };

Every book refers to a book manager, but the problem is that many books will have its own specific BookManager, but some books may share a common BookManager.

The caller doesn't really specify what the Book should do with its BookManager, but in about 90% of the cases, the BookManager can be destroyed together with the Book. In about 10% of the cases, the same BookManager is reused for multiple books, and the BookManager must not be deleted with the Book.

Deleting the BookManager together with the Book is handy in those 90% of the cases, as the caller of Book::setBookManager doesn't need to remember the BookManager anymore. It just dies with the Book itself.

I see two alternative solutions for solving this.

First is to make extensive use of shared pointers. If the caller is not interested anymore in the BookManager afterwards, it doesn't keep a shared pointer to it. If it is still interested in it, or if it wants the BookManager to be shared over multiple books, it keeps the shared pointer and passes it to those multiple books.

A second alternative is to tell the Book explicitly what to do with the ownership of the book, like this:

class Book
   {
   public:
      void setBookManager(BookManager *bookManager, book takeOwnership=true)
         {
         m_bookManager = bookManager;
         m_hasOwnership = takeOwnership;
         }
      ~Book()
         {
         if (m_hasOwnership && m_bookManager) delete m_bookManager;
         }
   private:
      BookManager *m_bookManager;
      bool m_hasOwnership;
   };

The second solution seems much easier and allows us to use normal pointer syntax (BookManager * as opposed to std::shared_ptr<BookManager>), but it seems less 'clean' than the shared pointer approach.

Another alternative might be to have a typedef in BookManager like this:

class BookManager
   {
   public:
      typedef std::shared_ptr<BookManager> Ptr;
      ...
   };

Which allows us to write this:

BookManager::Ptr bookManager;

Which looks more like the the normal pointer-syntax than the original shared pointer syntax.

Does anyone have experience with either approach? Any other suggestions?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

In C++ if you have shared, un-coordinated access to common objects then the most common approach is some kind of reference counting, which you get from shared_ptr.

The only downside is that it isn't pervasive in C++ (especially libraries), so you sometimes need access to the raw pointer. In those cases, you need to be careful to keep the object alive.

I suggest that if you used shared_ptr -- try to use it everywhere, unless it's impossible. And yes, use the typedef if you want.

share|improve this answer
    
"try to use it everywhere, unless it's impossible" - and that's how you end up with hard to trace circular refs. – Zach Saw Dec 7 '10 at 13:49

You seem to have this pretty well thought through. Looks like an ideal use for shared_ptr to me.

In the interests of adding SOME value for you, make sure you look at the templates for efficient shared_ptr creation here.

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There are 2 kinds of "ownership" in C++:

  • deterministic ownership: at any moment you can point who is responsible for the resource
  • shared ownership: at any moment there might be several owners, they are hard to pinpoint though

shared_ptr, as the name implies, is for the second case. It is rarely required, especially with the introduction of move semantics and thus unique_ptr, but in those cases where it is actually required, it's invaluable.

Looking at your case, the question I have is: do you actually need shared ownership ?

One typical solution to avoid shared ownership is to use a Factory, which will be the sole owner of all the objects it creates, and guarantees they are alive as long the Factory itself is alive.

It might be "less safe" than using a shared_ptr, but there are very interesting arguments:

  • the lifetime of the objects is deterministic once more, much easier to debug
  • there is no risk of creating a cycle of references (and leaking memory) by accident

Unless you are memory constrained (in which case the sooner the objects get deleted the better it is), you might wish to take a BookManagerFactory approach here.

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Only when you know exactly where the object is owned and take care to delete it there (!), should you use bare pointers. I have a "stack" of classes that each hold unique parent pointer, in which case the reference count would always be 1 and you can access the deepest element through the last child. It seems like you have a much more complicated setup here, though, go with smart pointers. Remember that even if a bare pointer might seem cleaner or easier, unique_ptr should be recommended, but you might have to battle move vs copy assignment in pre-conversion code and cryptic error messages resulting from the switch.

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Lou Franco already gave you the answer, but as a side note: Your second implementation idea is essentially what an auto_ptr does (when take ownership is true).

A better solution might be to have the Book class hold a handle (e.g. array index or hash) to a BookManager that residese in some BookManagerCache class. The Cache class is solely responsible for managing the lifetimes of BookManagers.

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