Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My application has a defined structure:

typedef struct zsSysVersionMsg_tag
{
    WORD cmd;
    BYTE len;
} zsSysVersionMsg_t;

I would expect sizeof(zsSysVersionMsg_t) to evaluate to 3. However, when I run my application it evaluates to 4. Can someone explain why this is? (I really need it to evaluate to 3.) Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Standard says it will evaluate to >= wizeof(WORD) + sizeof(BYTE), not necesarrily exactly –  John Dibling Dec 6 '10 at 17:52
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Most platforms will "align" and "pad" structures so that they begin and end exactly on a word boundary. This is done to improve memory performance.

Assuming you are on Windows, you can set your own alignment. In your case, you want to align on single bytes, so do this:

#pragma pack( push, 1 )
typedef struct zsSysVersionMsg_tag
{
    WORD cmd;
    BYTE len;
} zsSysVersionMsg_t;
#pragma pack( pop )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, John. Does the #pragma pack( push, 1 ) indicate single-byte alignment, or does it simply add a single byte of padding? I ask because I recognize the push and pop instructions from my assembly days, and (not that I doubt you, but) I don't see how these instructions will help. Also, do I need to put these pragma statements around every type-definition, or can I do something like pragrma, typedef, typedef, typedef, pragma? –  Jim Fell Dec 6 '10 at 19:14
    
the 1 tells it to align on a 1-byte boundary. push and pop do what you think. they push and pop the previous alignment. –  John Dibling Dec 6 '10 at 19:52
add comment

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_structure_alignment

How to make it evaluate to 3 also appears in this article

share|improve this answer
2  
Be aware that data alignment techniques are platform-specific. –  John Dibling Dec 6 '10 at 17:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.