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I created mvc project and want to upload the file. I registered in the web.config

<httpRuntime maxRequestLength="2000"/> 
<customErrors mode="On" redirectMode="ResponseRedirect" defaultRedirect="address here"> </ customErrors>, in Index.aspx <% using (Html.BeginForm ("upload", "home", FormMethod.Post, 
    new {enctype = "multipart / form-data"})) {%> 
    <label for="file"> Filename: </ label> 
    <input type="file" name="file" id="file" /> 

    <input type="submit" /> 
<%}%> 

In HomeController.cs

[HttpPost] 
public ActionResult Upload (HttpPostedFileBase file) 
{ 
    if (file! = null & & file.ContentLength> 0) 
    { 
        if (file.ContentLength> 4096000) 
        { 
            return RedirectToAction ("FileTooBig"); 
        } 
        var fileName = Path.GetFileName (file.FileName); 
        var path = Path.Combine (Server.MapPath ("~ / App_Data / uploads"), fileName); 
        file.SaveAs (path); 
    } 
    return RedirectToAction ("Index"); 
} 

If I attach files over 2 megabytes DefaultRedirect works perfectly in Opera, but does not work in Chrome and IE. I also used Response.Redirect ("address here") in Application_Error () event in global.asax. It also does not work in Chrome and IE. What should I do?

share|improve this question

maxRequestLength is in Kilobytes (KB). You have yours set to 2000KB (which is slightly less than 2MB as there are 1024KB in 1MB).

I'm not sure why it is working in some browsers and not others, unless some are compressing the entire upload content and others are not (which I believe is supported by HTTP 1.1).

HTH, Brian

share|improve this answer

There is no way to prevent the file from being uploaded. IIS receives the entire HTTP request body before passing it to the ASP.NET stack. This includes all parts of your multi-part form post. Because of this ASP.NET really has no chance of interrupting a file from being uploaded by checking the file.ContentLength property.

You can write a custom HTTP module to check the file size but aborting or closing the response before receiving the entire request results in an empty response. Meaning there is no way to fail gracefully.

My suggestion would be do do your file upload in a hidden iframe while implementing the HTTP module. That way if something goes wrong, your main page won't break.

Everyone can join me in thanking Microsoft for this awesome "feature" (queue in the sarcasm).

Thanks Microsoft. Thanks.

share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if you found a solution or workaround for this. But did you find out that you can't cancel the file transfer? Its just not possible with IIS. – Andrew Young Jan 7 '11 at 18:33

Try this. This snippet was tested and worked as expected. In the future try not using var type for string variable. var is a dynamic type and should work for all file types - including array. But try to be specific with file type will help reduce errors.

I normally keep my public files in public folder. So, change it to your folder (eg App_Data)

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult test(HttpPostedFileBase file)
{
    if (file.ContentLength> 4096000)  
        {  
            return RedirectToAction ("FileTooBig");  
        }  

    string fileName = Path.GetFileName(file.FileName);
    string uploadPath = Server.MapPath("~/Public/uploads/" + fileName);

    file.SaveAs(uploadPath);
    return View("Index");
}

Good luck

share|improve this answer
    
I need to check the file size before uploading. I can do that in the event Application_BeginRequest in Global.asax, but how to cancel the download file if size is greater than my variable maxFileSize? If I use Redirect in this event, the file is first loaded, and then works Redirect. – Stwr Dec 6 '10 at 18:55
    
You cannot check a file without http request. Notice [httpPost] above the actionresult method requires a submit input. Once submitted the httpPostFileBase is waiting for processing. Now, you can use your logic to do whatever you wish with the file. – Jack Dec 6 '10 at 19:52
    
I can check the file size before uploading inside Application_BeginRequest() event BEFORE file will be uploaded. If I use [HttpPost] public ActionResult functionName(), file will be uploaded totally and then I can check file size. The second option is bad for this project. But I don't know how to cancel the download file if size is greater than my variable maxFileSize (first option). – Stwr Dec 6 '10 at 20:49
    
var is not dynamic. The compiler uses type inference at compile time to determine the type. If you do var a = "hello"; then later you do a = 5;, the compiler will throw an exception because 5 cannot be implicitly cast to the type string. – Brian Ball Dec 6 '10 at 21:59

Then try using the if-the-else. This snippet works. If you like it, vote me.

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult test(HttpPostedFileBase file)
{
    if (file.ContentLength > 400)
    {
        return RedirectToAction("GeneralError", "Error");
    }
    else
    {
        string fileName = Path.GetFileName(file.FileName);
        string uploadPath = Server.MapPath("~/Public/uploads/" + fileName);

        file.SaveAs(uploadPath);
        return View("Index");
    }
}

two input buttons required: For browsing the file: For submitting the file:

Good Luck!

share|improve this answer

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