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I like the shortcut in C# of lock(myLock){ /* do stuff */}. Is there an equivalent for read/write locks? (Specifically ReaderWriterLockSlim.) Right now, I use the following custom method, which I think works, but is kind of annoying because I have to pass in my action as an anonymous function, and I would prefer to use a standard locking mechanism if possible.

    void bool DoWithWriteLock(ReaderWriterLockSlim RWLock, int TimeOut, Action Fn)
    {
        bool holdingLock = false;
        try
        {
            if (RWLock.TryEnterWriteLock(TimeOut))
            {
                holdingLock = true;
                Fn();
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            if (holdingLock)
            {
                RWLock.ExitWriteLock();
            }
        }
        return holdingLock;
    }
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1  
The try statement is in the wrong place. Put it after TryEnterWriteLock(). No more need for a variable, a shortcut gets to be pointless. –  Hans Passant Dec 6 '10 at 18:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can't override the behaviour of the lock keyword. A common technique is to hijack the using keyword.

  1. Make DoWithWriteLock return an IDisposable
  2. Keep the TryEnterWriteLock call inside the DoWithWriteLock method
  3. Return an object that implements IDisposable. In that object's Dispose method, put the call to ExitWriteLock.

The end result:

// Before
DoWithWriteLock(rwLock,
    delegate
    {
        Do1();
        Do2()
    } );

// After
using (DoWithWriteLock(rwLock))
{
    Do1();
    Do2();
}
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1  
before can be much better: DoWithWriteLock(rwLock, () => { Do1(); Do2() } ); –  Andrey Dec 6 '10 at 18:20
    
Hi Tim. Is it true this would be easier in F#? –  jonnii Dec 6 '10 at 18:20
    
Is there an analogous way to do this for TryEnterWriteLock with a timeout? –  Xodarap Dec 6 '10 at 18:55
    
@jonnii F#'s lock function is essentially the OP's original DoWithWriteLock, but using Monitor.Enter: lock syncRoot (fun () -> do1 |> do2) –  Tim Robinson Dec 6 '10 at 19:10
1  
In the actual implementation, it's best to return a struct that publicly implements IDisposable (to avoid unnecessary heap allocations and/or boxing); see blogs.msdn.com/b/ericgu/archive/2004/03/24/95743.aspx for background. –  Bradley Grainger Jan 5 '11 at 13:16

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