Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just started learning C++. Can some explain the difference between the following C++ function prototypes?

void f(int n);
extern void f(int n);
static void f(int n);
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

The void and extern void versions are the same. They indicate that the function has external linkage (i.e. the definition of the function may be expected to come from some other C or C++ file). Static indicates that the function has internal linkage, and will exist only in the current C++ file.

You almost never see these specifiers applied to functions because 99.9% of the time you want the default extern behavior.

You may see the static or extern storage specifiers on global variables though, which is often done to reduce name conflicts with other files in the same project. This is a holdover from C; if you're using C++ this kind of thing should be done with an anonymous namespace instead of static.

share|improve this answer
4  
Slight nitpick: the first doesn't necessarily indicate external linkage. It could simply be a forward declaration for a function definition which will appear later in the same translation unit. –  Charles Salvia Dec 6 '10 at 19:23
    
@Charles: If the function exists in the same implementation file, then it will be exported by that same file for other files to use, in which case it still has external linkage. (Though, you are correct that the function itself need not come from another translation unit) –  Billy ONeal Dec 6 '10 at 19:24
    
Right, I should have worded that as "doesn't necessarily indicate the function definition is expected in some other C or C++ file." –  Charles Salvia Dec 6 '10 at 19:29
    
@Charles: Modified slightly. Better? –  Billy ONeal Dec 6 '10 at 19:55
    
should mention anonymous namespaces... –  Neil G Dec 6 '10 at 20:29

The first two are the same thing. The third one gives f internal linkage, meaning that a different source file may use the name f to be something different.

The use of static as in that third example should not be used. Instead use an anonymous namespace:

namespace { // anonymous
  void f(int n);
}
share|improve this answer

This is more of a C-language question than a C++ one, but:

void f(int n);

Declares a function f that takes a single integer parameter.

extern void f(int n);

Declares a function f that takes a single integer parameter but exists in some other file. The compiler will trust that you have implemented the function somewhere. If the linker cannot find it, you will get a linker error.

static void f(int n);

Declares a function f that takes a single integer parameter. The static keyword makes this interesting. If this is in a .cpp file, the function will only be visible to that file. If it is in a .h file, every .cpp file that includes that header will create its own copy of that function that is only accessible to that implementation file.

share|improve this answer

Both answers so far have deprecated the use of static functions. Why? What makes

namespace {
void f(int n);
}

superior to

static void f(int n);

? It's not simpler, it's not easier to understand...

share|improve this answer
1  
I think the anonymous namespace is a better solution to indicate internal linkage. The static keyword is already overloaded enough. –  Charles Salvia Dec 6 '10 at 19:31
    
@Charles: Strictly speaking, a function in an anonymous namespace still has external linking: bytes.com/topic/c/answers/835990-anonymous-namespace-linkage –  Nemanja Trifunovic Dec 6 '10 at 19:41
    
@Nemanja: That really doesn't matter though; it's effectively static even if the symbol is exported, because it's backed by a real namespace that's given a generated name. You can't call it from other files, and therefore it might as well be static. –  Billy ONeal Dec 6 '10 at 19:56
    
@Billy: You are pretty much right. The only difference is that external linking affects link speed which becomes noticable on big enough projects. –  Nemanja Trifunovic Dec 6 '10 at 20:04
    
I rest my case. –  TonyK Dec 6 '10 at 23:19

Anonymous namespace is a more universal and cleaner solution, you can have functions, variables, classes in it. And static is way too overloaded, in some contexts meaning internal linkage, in others static lifetime.
There is one disadvantage of anonymous namespace though. Because of external linkage, the exported section of your object/library files will swell with all those long <unique namespace name>::<function> names which wouldn't be there is they were static.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.