Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am making a wxPython app which supplies a shell for the user to use. (This is wx.lib.shell.PyShell, the shell that ships with wxPython.)

Problem is, definitions made in this shell have a bad .__module__ attribute. For example:

>>> def f(): 0
... 
>>> f.__module__
>>> f.__module__ is None
True
>>> class A(object):
...     pass
...     
>>> 
>>> A.__module__
'__builtin__'

I think the .__module__ attribute for both these objects should be __main__. Not sure. But it definitely shouldn't be either None or __builtin__.

How can I make the shell give a good .__module__ attribute to these functions and classes?

share|improve this question
    
I think they both should be None. –  Gabi Purcaru Dec 6 '10 at 19:47
    
What makes you think the shell is giving the objects the attribute with this value? –  martineau Dec 6 '10 at 19:55
    
What is the value of __name__ in your wx-based shell? It's '__main__' in the standard Python shell. Perhaps you can set that to what you want in your shell's initialization. –  martineau Dec 6 '10 at 20:07
add comment

2 Answers 2

In IDLE and in the wxPython Demo's PyShell demo, I get the following:

>>> def f(): 0

>>> f.__module__
'__main__'
>>> f.__module__ is None
False
>>> class A(object):
        pass

>>> A.__module__
'__main__'

It seems to work correctly to me. I'm not sure what you're doing on your machine. I am using Python 2.5, wxPython 2.8.10.1 on Windows XP.

share|improve this answer
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason this happened is because I was using a custom locals dict, and neglected to put a meaningful '__name__' in it. Once you put a '__name__' item in the locals dict you give to PyShell, its value will be used to set the .__module__ attribute for functions and classes defined in the shell.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.