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I am having a hard time understanding attr_accessors in Ruby, can someone explain them to me? I have done tons of Google searches, just can't understand them fully.

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9  

9 Answers 9

up vote 810 down vote accepted

Let's say you have a class Person.

class Person
end

person = Person.new
person.name # => no method error

Obviously we never defined method name. Let's do that.

class Person
  def name
    @name # simply returning an instance variable @name
  end
end

person = Person.new
person.name # => nil
person.name = "Dennis" # => no method error

Aha, we can read the name, but that doesn't mean we can assign the name. Those are two different methods. Former called reader and latter called writer. We didn't create the writer yet so let's do that.

class Person
  def name
    @name
  end

  def name=(str)
    @name = str
  end
end

person = Person.new
person.name = 'Dennis'
person.name # => "Dennis"

Awesome. Now we can write and read instance variable @name using reader and writer methods. Except, this is done so frequently, why waste time writing these methods every time? We can do it easier.

class Person
  attr_reader :name
  attr_writer :name
end

Even this can get repetitive. When you want both reader and writer just use accessor!

class Person
  attr_accessor :name
end

person = Person.new
person.name = "Dennis"
person.name # => "Dennis"

Works the same way! And guess what: the instance variable @name in our person object will be set just like when we did it manually, so you can use it in other methods.

class Person
  attr_accessor :name

  def greeting
    "Hello #{@name}"
  end
end

person = Person.new
person.name = "Dennis"
person.greeting # => "Hello Dennis"

That's it. In order to understand how attr_reader, attr_writer, and attr_accessor methods actually generate methods for you, read other answers, books, ruby docs.

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11  
@hakunin - thank you for that clear answer. What is missing for me is why the Ruby syntax suggests a colon ':' for the instance variables in the attr_* statement? It seems that it would be more straight forward to use the same '@' syntax that is used elsewhere in the class to refer to the variable. –  Will May 24 '12 at 18:34
75  
@WilliamSmith To answer your question you need to understand that attr_accessor is a method called on the current class, and :name is a parameter you pass to that method. It's not a special syntax, it's a simple method call. If you were to give it @name variable, it wouldn't make sense, because @name would contain nil. So it would be like writing attr_accessor nil. You are not passing it a variable that it needs to create, you are passing the name that you want the variable to be called. –  hakunin May 24 '12 at 19:30
8  
@hakunin - That makes total sense. I've just today been learning that ruby is actually 'running' as it parses through a file and that every statement and expression is actually a method call on some object. Including attr_accessor. Very helpful. –  Will May 25 '12 at 0:35
14  
used Rails for 3 years, never even knew this. Shame –  Jean-Paul Mar 1 '13 at 21:46
2  
That is some awesome answer! –  Ziyan Junaideen Apr 23 '13 at 10:38

attr_accesssor is just a method. (The link should provide more insight with how it works - look at the pairs of methods generated, and a tutorial should show you how to use it.)

The trick is that class is not a definition in Ruby (it is "just a definition" in languages like C++ and Java), but it is an expression that evaluates. It is during this evaluation when the attr_accessor method is invoked which in turn modifies the current class - remember the implicit receiver: self.attr_accessor, where self is the "open" class object at this point.

The need for attr_accessor and friends, is, well:

  1. Ruby, like SmallTalk, does not allow instance variables to be accessed outside of methods1 for that object. That is, instance variables cannot be accessed in the x.y form as is common in say, Java or even Python. In Ruby y is always taken as a message to send (or "method to call"). Thus the attr_* methods create wrappers which proxy the instance @variable access through dynamically created methods.

  2. Boilerplate sucks

Hope this clarifies some of the little details. Happy coding.


1 This isn't strictly true and there are some "techniques" around this, but there is no syntax support for "public instance variable" access.

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2  
+1 for explaining the semantics! –  bchurchill Jan 23 '13 at 11:58

attr_accessor is (as @pst stated) just a method. What it does is create more methods for you.

So this code here:

class Foo
  attr_accessor :bar
end

is equivalent to this code:

class Foo
  def bar
    @bar
  end
  def bar=( new_value )
    @bar = new_value
  end
end

You can write this sort of method yourself in Ruby:

class Module
  def var( method_name )
    inst_variable_name = "@#{method_name}".to_sym
    define_method method_name do
      instance_variable_get inst_variable_name
    end
    define_method "#{method_name}=" do |new_value|
      instance_variable_set inst_variable_name, new_value
    end
  end
end

class Foo
  var :bar
end

f = Foo.new
p f.bar     #=> nil
f.bar = 42
p f.bar     #=> 42
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Don't think this well help the OP much since in his "tons of Google searches" he most likely ran across the standard definitions of attr_accessor in the official ruby docs. –  bowsersenior Dec 6 '10 at 21:55
4  
@bowsersenior you might be right, but it sure helped me. –  ellisbben Mar 1 '12 at 19:25
    
This is a great example of where metaprogramming is used in even the most beginner-level scenarios. Very nice. –  John Simon Feb 26 at 7:33

attr_accessor is very simple:

attr_accessor :foo

is a shortcut for:

def foo=(val)
  @foo = val
end

def foo
  @foo
end

it is nothing more than a getter/setter for an object

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1  
Calling it a 'shortcut' sounds like it's syntax sugar or some form of macro expanded by the interpreter (instead of the method that it actually is). –  Phrogz Dec 6 '10 at 21:47
2  
your answer is fine. 'Shortcut' means "a shorter alternative route" according to my dictionary, not "syntax sugar" or "macro interpreted by the interpreter". –  bowsersenior Dec 6 '10 at 21:57

It is just a method that defines getter and setter methods for instance variables. An example implementation would be:

def self.attr_accessor(*names)
  names.each do |name|
    define_method(name) {instance_variable_get("@#{name}")} # This is the getter
    define_method("#{name}=") {|arg| instance_variable_set("@#{name}", arg)} # This is the setter
  end
end
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Basically they fake publicly accessible data attributes, which Ruby doesn't have.

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4  
Basically this answer is also correct !! –  Driss Bounouar Sep 19 '13 at 11:33
2  
Though this comment isn't entirely useful, it is true. Highlights the fact that public data attributes don't exist outside of "get" methods in Ruby, which is really useful info for someone trying to learn the language. –  Eric Dand Oct 7 '13 at 7:54
1  
This really shouldn't be downvoted. As a non-Ruby guy trying to figure this stuff out, this answer is very helpful! –  Brad Dec 19 '13 at 19:26
1  
Agreed, seems very simmilar to C#'s name {get; set;} –  David Miler Dec 23 '13 at 14:54

I think part of what confuses new Rubyists/programmers (like myself) is:

"Why can't I just tell the instance it has any given attribute (e.g., name) and give that attribute a value all in one swoop?"

A little more generalized, but this is how it clicked for me:

Given:

class Person
end

We haven't defined Person as something that can have a name or any other attributes for that matter.

So if we then:

baby = Person.new

...and try to give them a name...

baby.name = "Ruth"

We get an error because, in Rubyland, a Person class of object is not something that is associated with or capable of having a "name" ... yet!

BUT we can use any of the given methods (see previous answers) as a way to say, "An instance of a Person class (baby) can now have an attribute called 'name', therefore we not only have a syntactical way of getting and setting that name, but it makes sense for us to do so."

Again, hitting this question from a slightly different and more general angle, but I hope this helps the next instance of class Person who finds their way to this thread.

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Simply attr-accessor creates the getter and setter methods for the specified attributes

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Simply put it will define a setter and getter for the class.

Note that

attr_reader :v is equivalant to 
def v
  @v
end

attr_writer :v is equivalant to
def v=(value)
  @v=value
end

So

attr_accessor :v which means 
attr_reader :v; attr_writer :v 

are equivalant to define a setter and getter for the class.

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