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I hate decimal numbers. For 1.005 I don't get the result I expect with the following code.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use POSIX qw(floor);

my $num = (1.005 * 100) + 0.5;
print $num . "\n";          # 101
print floor($num) . "\n";   # 100
print int($num) . "\n";     # 100

For 2.005 and 3.005 it works fine.

With this ugly "hack" I get the expected result.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict;
use POSIX qw(floor);

my $num = (1.005 * 100) + 0.5;
$num = "$num";
print $num . "\n";          # 101
print floor($num) . "\n";   # 101
print int($num) . "\n";     # 101

What is the correct way to do this?

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4  
What Every Computer Scientist Should Know About Floating-Point Arithmetic: docs.sun.com/source/806-3568/ncg_goldberg.html. You might try using pairs of integers as rational numbers instead of this. –  nlucaroni Dec 6 '10 at 21:24
2  
You are actually working with floating-point numbers, not decimal numbers as that term is usually defined in architecture theory. –  cdhowie Dec 6 '10 at 21:24
    
Yeah, I know decimal numbers aren't exact. I call them decimal numbers even though the correct term may be floating-point numbers. English isn't my main language and I don't write in English very often. Bare with me. ;) –  Johan Soderberg Dec 6 '10 at 21:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

floor() is not for rounding, it goes down to the nearest integer.

See this old post: How do you round a floating point number in Perl?

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1  
BigFloat or BigRat (for rational numbers, as I mentioned previously). –  nlucaroni Dec 6 '10 at 22:01
3  
You guys REALLY need to understand the IEEE “round towards even” floating-point rule, and why that’s what gets used. perl -e 'printf "%.0f ", $_+.5 for -10 .. +10 produces the sequence -10 -8 -8 -6 -6 -4 -4 -2 -2 -0 0 2 2 4 4 6 6 8 8 10 10. HTH! –  tchrist Dec 6 '10 at 23:15
2  
@Johan: Round toward even is mathematically sound. Always rounding 5’s up is unsound and biased. Then you have five digits going up and four going down. That’s just wrong. –  tchrist Dec 6 '10 at 23:50
2  
@Orbling: Are you telling me that 7.5 is closer to 8 than it is to 7? –  tchrist Dec 7 '10 at 0:06
1  
@tchrist. No, obviously not, because contrary to your believe I am not a complete moron. However, I would rather 7.5 did not round to the same value as 8.5 - that does not give good distribution. –  Orbling Dec 7 '10 at 0:09

The “correct” way to round is whatever way you choose to define as correct for whatever purpose you have in mind. People have thought a lot about it, and some strategies are more appropriate for some application areas than they are in others.

Rounding toward zero by using int() is seldom what people want. Usually they want something that is numerically unbiased.

Fair splits the fives; hence the shorthand term, “round towards even”. The nearer integer isn’t defined: there is no nearer integer when the least siginficant digit is 5. There are 9 things that when rounded give a different answer: 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9.

To be fair, you must have half of those go one way and half go the other. But there are nine numbers, so you have four go one way and four go the other, but now you have a fairness problem. The only way therefore to avoid bias is for the 5 cases to alternate up and down. That’s why it works this way.

% perl -e 'printf "%.0f\n", $_+.5 for -10 .. +10'

produces the sequence

-10 -8 -8 -6 -6 -4 -4 -2 -2 -0 0 2 2 4 4 6 6 8 8 10 10

While this round-towards-zero approach:

% perl -e 'print int($_+.5)," " for -10 .. +10; print "\n"'

makes this with a hump in the middle:

 -9 -8 -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

Looking again at round-towards-even:

% perl -le 'printf "%.1f ", $_+.05 for -10 .. +10'

-9.9 -8.9 -8.0 -7.0 -6.0 -5.0 -4.0 -3.0 -1.9 -0.9 0.1 1.1 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 7.0 8.1 9.1 10.1 

That makes more sense if you do this:

% perl -le 'printf "%.2f ", $_+.05 for -10 .. +10'

-9.95 -8.95 -7.95 -6.95 -5.95 -4.95 -3.95 -2.95 -1.95 -0.95 0.05 1.05 2.05 3.05 4.05 5.05 6.05 7.05 8.05 9.05 10.05 

and then consider what towards even means.

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