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I got this message:

expected 'void **' but argument is of type 'char **'

when I tried to compile something similar to this:

void myfree( void **v )
{
    if( !v || !*v )
        return;

    free( *v );
    *v = NULL;

    return;
}



I found what I think is a solution after reading this question on stack overflow:
Avoid incompatible pointer warning when dealing with double-indirection - Stack Overflow

So I adjusted to something like this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void myfree( void *x )
{
    void **v = x;

    if( !v || !*v )
        return;

    free( *v );
    *v = NULL;

    return;
}

int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    char *test;

    if( ( test = malloc( 1 ) ) )
    {
        printf( "before: %p\n", test );
        myfree( &test );
        printf( "after: %p\n", test );
    }

    return 0;
}

Is this legal C? I am dereferencing a void pointer aren't I?

Thanks guys


EDIT 12/10/2010 4:45PM EST:
As it has been pointed out free(NULL) is safe and covered by the C standard. Also, as discussed below my example above is not legal C. See caf's answer, Zack's answer, and my own answer.

Therefore it's going to be easier for me to initalize any to-be-malloc'd pointers as NULL and then later on to just free() and NULL out directly in the code:

free( pointer );
pointer = NULL;

The reason I was checking for NULL in myfree() like I did was because of my experiences with fclose(). fclose(NULL) can segfault depending on platform (eg xpsp3 msvcrt.dll 7.0.2600.5512) and so I had assumed (mistakenly) the same thing could happen with free(). I had figured rather than clutter up my code with if statements I could better implement in a function.

Thanks everyone for all the good discussion

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3  
Some will call me a heathen but I would just use define myfree(x) do { free(x); x = NULL } while(0) –  Chris Lutz Dec 6 '10 at 22:06
1  
You are not dereferencing a 'pointer to void'. You are dereferencing a 'pointer to pointer to void', which is perfectly legal. –  aschepler Dec 6 '10 at 22:12
1  
Actually, I want to correct my previous macro: #define myfree(x) do { void **tmp_ = &x; free(*tmp_); *tmp_ = NULL; } while(0) (I thought there wasn't a way to avoid double evaluation of x but there is!) –  Chris Lutz Dec 6 '10 at 22:19
1  
@Chris Lutz: Your new macro has the same problem as the OPs code - only void * values can now be legally passed as x. Under GCC you could use typeof(x) *tmp_ = &x;. –  caf Dec 6 '10 at 23:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, this is not legal C, unless you pass the address of a void * object to myfree() (so you might as well just keep your original definition).

The reason is that in your example, an object of type char * (the object declared as test in main()) is modified through an lvalue of type void * (the lvalue *v in myfree()). §6.5 of the C standard states:

7 An object shall have its stored value accessed only by an lvalue expression that has one of the following types:

— a type compatible with the effective type of the object,
— a qualified version of a type compatible with the effective type of 
the object,
— a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to the effective
type of the object,
— a type that is the signed or unsigned type corresponding to a qualified
version of the effective type of the object,
— an aggregate or union type that includes one of the aforementioned
types among its members (including, recursively, a member of a subaggregate
or contained union), or
— a character type.

Since void * and char * are not compatible types, this constraint has been broken. The condition for two pointer types to be compatible is described in §6.7.5.1:

For two pointer types to be compatible, both shall be identically qualified and both shall be pointers to compatible types.

To achieve the effect you want, you must use a macro:

#define MYFREE(p) (free(p), (p) = NULL)

(There is no need to check for NULL, since free(NULL) is legal. Note that this macro evaluates p twice).

share|improve this answer
    
It is required for any pointer-to-object to be convertible to void * and back without loss of information; thus clearing a pointer-to-object via a void * alias is overwhelmingly likely to DTRT even when not all pointers have the same representation. The only case where it mightn't is if the null pointer constant is not all-bits-zero for all pointer-to-object types, but AFAIK nobody - truly nobody - does that anymore. I suppose you might also have to worry about overoptimization due to the type-based aliasing rules, feh. –  Zack Dec 6 '10 at 22:25
    
Cite the standard? This doesn't quite sound right... –  Chris Lutz Dec 6 '10 at 22:25
    
Further, it occurs to me that the semantics of malloc and free themselves pretty much require the null pointer constant to be the same bit pattern for all pointers-to-object. –  Zack Dec 6 '10 at 22:28
2  
@Zack you are confusing two things. One: Converting a double* to a void* (what you do). Two: Treating a double* as if it was a void* - in other words, type punning (what he does, and what is undefined behavior). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Dec 7 '10 at 0:09
1  
@Anonymous Question Guy: It's true that void * and char * are required to have the same representation and alignment requirements, but that doesn't make them compatible types, which has a specific definition. I tend to agree that either there should be an exception to make void * and char * compatible types, or an exception allowing void * objects to be accessed through char * lvalues and vice-versa, to give the requirement in §6.2.5 its full intended effect. –  caf Dec 12 '10 at 4:28

This is perfectly legal but can get confusing for other people who read your code.

You could also use casting to eliminate the warning:

myfree((void **)&rest);

This is more readable and understandable.

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In C you have no choice but to introduce a cast somewhere in here. I would use a macro to ensure that things were done correctly at the call site:

void
myfree_(void **ptr)
{
    if (!ptr || !*ptr) return;
    free(*ptr);
    *ptr = 0;
}
#define myfree(ptr) myfree_((void **)&(ptr))

[You could actually name both the function and the macro "myfree", thanks to C's no-infinite-macro-recursion rules! But it would be confusing for human readers. Per the long discussion below caf's answer, I will also stipulate that the statement *ptr = 0 here modifies an object of unknown type through a void** alias, which is runtime-undefined behavior -- however, my informed opinion is, it will not cause problems in practice, and it's the least bad option available in plain C; caf's macro that evaluates its argument twice seems far more likely (to me) to cause real problems.]

In C++ you could use a template function, which is better on three counts: it avoids needing to take the address of anything at the call site, it doesn't break type correctness, and you will get a compile-time error instead of a run-time crash if you accidentally pass a non-pointer to myfree.

template <typename T>
void
myfree(T*& ptr)
{
    free((void *)ptr);
    ptr = 0;
}

But of course in C++ you have even better options available, such as smart pointer and container classes.

It should, finally, be mentioned that skilled C programmers eschew this kind of wrapper, because it does not help you when there's another copy of the pointer to the memory you just freed hanging around somewhere -- and that's exactly when you need help.

share|improve this answer
    
I usually write the function and macro with the same names, and when I call the function (in the macro or elsewhere) I write it as (myfree)(x);, which a) disables the preprocessor macro expansion, b) clarifies that I'm not calling the macro, and c) allows you to pass myfree (instead of myfree_) as a function pointer. –  Chris Lutz Dec 6 '10 at 22:17
    
That's a good trick, yah. –  Zack Dec 6 '10 at 22:18
    
Oooh, I like the idea of hiding the cast inside a macro. I like your way here much better than hiding the setting to NULL inside a macro, because your way here preserves the address (&) operator, which is an important visual cue that the pointer will change (e.g., be zeroed out). –  Todd Lehman Jan 31 '13 at 6:30
    
Erm, I take that back. Your myfree_((void **)&(ptr)) doesn't preserve the & address operator in the calling source — it still hides it in the macro. How about defining myfree as myfree_((void **)(ptr)) so that the user says myfree(&ptr) rather than myfree(ptr)? That seems preferable to me. –  Todd Lehman Jan 31 '13 at 6:33
    
If I were going to do this at all (which, in fact, I wouldn't -- see the last paragraph of the answer) I would consider it more important to make sure that the address is always taken than to have the & be visible in the source code. I may be saying this because I'm used to C++ nowadays, and by-reference out-parameters don't have any such visual clue. –  Zack Jan 31 '13 at 14:02

caf's answer is correct: No, it's not legal. And as Zack points out breaking the law in this way is apparently least likely to cause problems.

I found what appears to be another solution in the comp.lang.c FAQ list · Question 4.9, which notes that an intermediate void value has to be used.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void myfree( void **v )
{
    if( !v )
        return;

    free( *v );
    *v = NULL;

    return;
}

int main( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    double *num;

    if( ( num = malloc( sizeof( double ) ) ) )
    {
        printf( "before: %p\n", num );

        {
            void *temp = num;
            myfree( &temp );
            num = temp;
        }

        printf( "after: %p\n", num );
    }

    return 0;
}


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