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I have to check whether a form field contains '@' at start of user input & is it contains it at all. It works fine for checking if its at start of the string. But when I add checking whether input contains '@' at all or not. It fails. Here is my code

  function email_valid(field) 
    { 
      var apos=field.update.value;
          apos=apos.indexOf('@');
            if (apos>0 ||((apos.contains('@')== 'FALSE')))
              { alert('plz enter valid input');
                return false;
              }
            else 
            { return true; }
    }

EDIT

This function in this form is checking both if @ is at 1st place & 2ndly is it in the input at all or not.

   function @_valid(field) 
        { 
          var ref=field.update.value;// I needed ref 4 other things
          var apos=ref.indexOf('@');
          if (apos>=0 )
             {
               if (apos==0)
                   {
                    return true;
                   }
                 else { field.t_update3.value=""; 
                        alert('plz enter a valid refernce');
                        return false;
                      }
                     }
                   else { field.t_update3.value=""; 
                         alert('plz enter a valid refernce');
                         return false;
          }         }
share|improve this question
1  
@cdhowie, no, its not email validation. I need '@' at start of input. –  XCeptable Dec 6 '10 at 22:41
    
field.update.value? What is the update child? –  rhino Dec 6 '10 at 22:41
    
@XCeptable: Oops, sorry. I have still corrected your title though, since this has nothing whatsoever to do with PHP. –  cdhowie Dec 6 '10 at 22:41
    
@cdhowie, but I did not added php tag –  XCeptable Dec 6 '10 at 22:43
1  
@scunliffe: There are no $ prefixes on any variables. This cannot be PHP. –  cdhowie Dec 6 '10 at 22:46

9 Answers 9

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Consider:

var apos = value.indexOf('@');
if (apos >= 0) {
  // was found in string, somewhere
  if (apos == 0) {
    // was at start
  } else {
    // was elsewhere
  }
} else {
  // not in string
}

and

var apos = value.indexOf('@');
if (apos == 0) {
  // was at start
} else if (apos > 0) {
  // was elsewhere
} else {
  // not in string
}
share|improve this answer
    
though I did it by myself but its exactly same as yours answer(I added into edit). Perhaps your answer help me to gain confidence that my solution is not a work around only. thanks a lot –  XCeptable Dec 7 '10 at 11:27
    
@XCeptable You're welcome. Happy coding. –  user166390 Dec 8 '10 at 0:57

Why not just

if (apos !== 0) { /* error; */ }

The "apos" value will be the numeric value zero when your input is (as I understand it) valid, and either -1 or greater than 0 when invalid.

This seems like a strange thing to make a user of your site do, but whatever. (If it's not there at all, and it must be there to be valid, why can't you just add the "@" for the user?)

share|improve this answer
    
@Pointy, will this condition then check both @ is at 1st place in the input & it is present in input too ?? –  XCeptable Dec 6 '10 at 22:46
1  
@XCeptable: Yes. apos will be -1 if the character is not present, or greater than 0 if the character is present, but not as the first character. The return value of 0 means "the character is in the string, and it appears at the very beginning." –  cdhowie Dec 6 '10 at 22:47
    
This doesn't check that it doesn't appear later. –  SLaks Dec 6 '10 at 22:53
1  
Yes it does - "apos" would be a positive number if the "@" appeared somewhere in the string after the first character. As far as I can tell, the whole point is to ensure that the input string starts with an "@" character. Now, given the strange wording of the question, I could of course be wrong. –  Pointy Dec 6 '10 at 23:21
    
@Pointy, actually I want to ensure as SLaks said, either it is at 1st or it is not in the string at all. This is not checking anything at all. I have had made one function that is working what I want, I put in in EDIT –  XCeptable Dec 7 '10 at 11:17

You can just check to make sure that apos is greater than -1. Javascript's indexOf() will return the current index of the character you're looking for and -1 if it's not in the string.

edit Misread a bit. Also make sure that it's not equal to 0, so that it's not at the beginning of the string.

share|improve this answer
function email_valid(field) 
    { 
      var fieldValue =field.update.value;
      var apos = apos.indexOf('@');
            if (apos > 0 || apos < 0)//could also use apos !== 0
              { alert('plz enter valid input');
                return false;
              }
            else 
            { return true; }
    }

apos is the value returned by indexOf, it will be -1 if there is no @ in the user input. It will be 0 if it is the first character. It will be greater than 0 if the user input contains an @ . JavaScript has no contains method on a String.

share|improve this answer
    
before posting this question I tried this was i.e. (apos > 0 || apos < 0) but it did not work. !== 0 as mentioned by Pointy also do not work. I added code in EDIT that work fine for to check both conditions. –  XCeptable Dec 7 '10 at 11:24

Try:

function email_valid(field) {
    //var apos=field.update.value;
    var apos = field;
    //apos=apos.indexOf('@');
    apos = apos.indexOf('@');
    if( (apos < 0) ) {
        //alert('plz enter valid input');
        alert('false');
    } else {
        alert('true');
    }
}
email_valid('blah');

Checks for @ anywhere. Or, if you want to check for @ just at the beginning, change if( (apos < 0) ) { to if( (apos == 0) ) {. Or, if you want to make sure it's not at the beginning, then if( (apos > 0) ) {.

share|improve this answer

apos will be -1 if the string was not found. So your code should be as follows:

function email_valid(field) 
{ 
  var apos=field.value;
      apos=apos.indexOf('@');
        if (apos<=0) // handles '@' at the beginning and not in string at all.
        {
            alert('plz enter valid input');
            return false;
        }
        else 
        { return true; }
}

I also changed your initial assignment to remove the .update portion as that would cause it to fail when field is a reference to an input.

share|improve this answer
    
2sholsinger, it is not checking anything at all –  XCeptable Dec 6 '10 at 22:58

In the second if condition, apos is a number, not a string.

You're trying to write

if (field.update.value.charAt(0) == '@' && field.update.value.indexOf('@', 1) < 0)
share|improve this answer
    
How number ? as it will contain what value is input by user –  XCeptable Dec 6 '10 at 22:45
    
@XCeptable: Not after you write apos=apos.indexOf('@') –  SLaks Dec 6 '10 at 22:47
    
yes, you are right –  XCeptable Dec 7 '10 at 11:03

Learn about Regular expressions if you haven't already. Then lookup Javascript's String#match. There is no need to find wether the input starts with an "@" as if it contains an "@" that will also return true if the "@" is at the start of the string.

Also, for free, return true and return false are generally bad style. Just return the thing you passed to if (that evaluates to a boolean).

All in all:

function validate_input(str) {
    return str.match(/@/);
}

I reccomend passing the function a string (field.value or some-such) rather than the field itself as it makes it more generic.

share|improve this answer

Update: revised answer based on comments. code below will only return true if the value contains an "@" symbol at the first character.

If this is a JavaScript question, then this should be fine.

function email_valid(field){ 
  var apos=field.update.value;
  if(apos.indexOf('@') != 0){
    alert('plz enter valid input');
    return false;
  } else {
    //field contains an '@' at the first position (index zero)
    return true;
  }
}

That said, your parameter "field" if it actually refers to an input field element, should only require this code to get the value (e.g. I'm not sure where the ".update" bit comes into play)

var apos = field.value;

I would also rename this function if it isn't doing "email validation" to something a little more appropriately named.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I should have renamed it, just forget. –  XCeptable Dec 7 '10 at 10:47

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