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How can I calculate the days between 1 Jan 2010 and (for example) 3 Feb 2010?

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up vote 159 down vote accepted
NSDate *date1 = [NSDate dateWithString:@"2010-01-01 00:00:00 +0000"];
NSDate *date2 = [NSDate dateWithString:@"2010-02-03 00:00:00 +0000"];

NSTimeInterval secondsBetween = [date2 timeIntervalSinceDate:date1];

int numberOfDays = secondsBetween / 86400;

NSLog(@"There are %d days in between the two dates.", numberOfDays);

EDIT:

Remember, NSDate objects represent exact moments of time, they do not have any associated time-zone information. When you convert a string to a date using e.g. an NSDateFormatter, the NSDateFormatter converts the time from the configured timezone. Therefore, the number of seconds between two NSDate objects will always be time-zone-agnostic.

Furthermore, this documentation specifies that Cocoa's implementation of time does not account for leap seconds, so if you require such accuracy, you will need to roll your own implementation.

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why it is 86400 ? If it is February that has 28 days ...or other month it should be different . An additional method has to be added – Raluca Lucaci May 14 '12 at 15:05
4  
@RalucaGurau: 86400 is the number of seconds in a day (i.e. 60 seconds, times 60 minuts, times 24 hours). It has nothing to so with the month. – dreamlax May 14 '12 at 18:50
15  
Not all days have 86400 seconds. For a trivial example that's fine but it's not a good idea in the real world. DST changes, leap seconds, etc can all mess with it. NSCalendar can tell you how many seconds are in a given day. – NeilInglis Jun 7 '12 at 21:19
2  
@muthukumar: Not on iOS, the method is only available on Mac OS X. This question is tagged cocoa and not cocoa-touch so this answer only applies to Mac OS X. – dreamlax Sep 7 '12 at 11:11
1  
The number of days between any two moments in time will always be 86400. Whether humans are in the stage of fooling themselves to wake up an hour earlier than normal or not makes no difference to the fact that a day is 86400 seconds long (ignoring leap seconds) – dreamlax Apr 21 '15 at 1:32

You may want to use something like this:

NSDateComponents *components;
NSInteger days;

components = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] components: NSDayCalendarUnit 
        fromDate: startDate toDate: endDate options: 0];
days = [components day];

I believe this method accounts for situations such as dates that span a change in daylight savings.

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2  
is there a simple way to also ignore the time for the given dates? – Mihai Timar Oct 18 '13 at 7:40
    
can be accordingly changed for other calendar units :) used for Year unit. – tech savvy Feb 21 '14 at 10:49
    
NSDate objects are already time-zone agnostic. The time-zone information is removed when parsing dates with e.g. NSDateFormatter, so that NSDate objects represent exact moments in time. Therefore, if you already have startDate and endDate, these two objects will be x number of seconds apart. Time-zones will have nothing to do with it. – dreamlax Oct 29 '14 at 7:26
    
THJIS is actually the correct answer. – Benjamin Dec 9 '14 at 13:48
    
@Benjamin: Why do you say that? – dreamlax Dec 10 '14 at 19:02
NSTimeInterval diff = [date2 timeIntervalSinceDate:date1]; // in seconds

where date1 and date2 are NSDate's.

Also, note the definition of NSTimeInterval:

typedef double NSTimeInterval;
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Note that NSTimeInterval is really a double, so you can use it like any other number. – Kendall Helmstetter Gelner Dec 6 '10 at 23:00

Checkout this out. It takes care of daylight saving , leap year as it used iOS calendar to calculate.You can change the string and conditions to includes minutes with hours and days.

 +(NSString*)remaningTime:(NSDate*)startDate endDate:(NSDate*)endDate{

NSDateComponents *components;
NSInteger days;
NSInteger hour;
NSInteger minutes;
NSString *durationString;


components = [[NSCalendar currentCalendar] components: NSCalendarUnitDay|NSCalendarUnitHour|NSCalendarUnitMinute
                                             fromDate: startDate toDate: endDate options: 0];
days = [components day];
hour=[components hour];
minutes=[components minute];

if(days>0){

    if(days>1){
        durationString=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d days",days];
    }
    else{
        durationString=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d day",days];

    }
    return durationString;
}

if(hour>0){

    if(hour>1){
        durationString=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d hours",hour];
    }
    else{
        durationString=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d hour",hour];

    }
    return durationString;
}

if(minutes>0){

    if(minutes>1){
        durationString=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d minutes",minutes];
    }
    else{
        durationString=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d minute",minutes];

    }
    return durationString;
}

return @"";

}

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You can find the difference by converting the date in seconds and take time interval since 1970 for this and then you can find the difference between two dates.

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