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I want to write a function which filters a list of numbers by removing everything less than or equal to a specific number. The function will take two parameters: a list of numbers and the number to filter. The function should returns a list which has all the numbers larger than the filter number.

Sometime like this:

filter_num_list(L1,N,L2) :- ...

test_filter_num_list :- filter_num_list([1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],5,[5,6,7,8,9]).
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

try something like:

filter_num_list([],N,[]) :- true.  
filter_num_list([H|T],N,[H|S]) :- H > N,filter_num_list(T,N,S).  
filter_num_list([H|T],N,S) :- N >= H, filter_num_list(T,N,S).
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See also library predicates like include/3 and exclude/3:

?- include(=<(5), [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9], Is).
Is = [5, 6, 7, 8, 9].
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1  
I didn't know about exclude/3 and include/3, very useful, thanks. – sharky Aug 11 '11 at 23:17
    
include/3 and exclude/3 are library predicates in just a few Prolog systems. But this is a generic Prolog question with no indication of the system used. If you want to provide an answer that only works in some systems, at least list those systems. – Paulo Moura May 6 '15 at 15:03
1  
I recommend Richard O'Keefe's document for a nice list of such elementary library predicates, including useful definitions. – mat May 6 '15 at 16:57
    
The ROK's reference is a good one to add to the answer itself. But not necessarily a reference that a Prolog newbie will find by him/herself. – Paulo Moura May 7 '15 at 8:16
    
The document is one of the first hits when searching the web for: "include/3 Prolog". – mat May 7 '15 at 8:27

With tfilter/3 and the reified constraint (#<)/3, you can keep up and express what you want in no time!

:- use_module(library(clpfd)).

Here's a query that I ran with SWI-Prolog version 7.1.37:

?- tfilter(#<(5),[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9],Xs).
Xs = [6,7,8,9].                             % succeeds deterministically
false.

As the code is monotone, we can also ask more general queries and get logically sound answers.

?- tfilter(#<(7),[A,B,C],Xs).
Xs = [],      A in inf..7, B in inf..7, C in inf..7 ;
Xs = [C],     A in inf..7, B in inf..7, C in 8..sup ;
Xs = [B],     A in inf..7, B in 8..sup, C in inf..7 ;
Xs = [B,C],   A in inf..7, B in 8..sup, C in 8..sup ;
Xs = [A],     A in 8..sup, B in inf..7, C in inf..7 ;
Xs = [A,C],   A in 8..sup, B in inf..7, C in 8..sup ;
Xs = [A,B],   A in 8..sup, B in 8..sup, C in inf..7 ;
Xs = [A,B,C], A in 8..sup, B in 8..sup, C in 8..sup ;
false.
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CLP(FD) is a library only available in a few Prolog systems. But this is a generic Prolog question with no indication of the system used. If you want to provide an answer that only works in some systems, at least list those systems. – Paulo Moura May 6 '15 at 15:06
    
You're the one providing the answer. Why not simply listing the Prolog system or systems where you tested it? – Paulo Moura May 6 '15 at 15:20

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