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I have the following code that I want to achieve the following with.

  1. Check if a value is in cache
  2. If in cache, get the value from it and proceed
  3. If not in cache, perform the logic to enter it in cache but do this async as the operation to do such may take a long period of time and I dont want to hold up the user

As you will see in my code I place a lock on the cache in the async thread. Is my setup below thread safe? And by placing the lock will this mean that the cache will not be accessible for other threads to read from cache while the async operation takes place. I do not want a circumstance where the cache is locked in an async thread preventing other requests from accessing it.

There is also a chance that the same request may be called by several threads hence the lock.

Any recommendations as how I could improve the code would be great.

// Check if the value is in cache
        if (!this.Cache.Contains(key))
        {
            // Perform processing of files async in another thread so rendering is not slowed down
            ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate
            {
                lock (this.Cache)
                {
                    if (!this.Cache.Contains(key))
                    {
                        // Perform the operation to get value for cache here
                        var cacheValue = operation();

                        this.Cache.Add(key, cacheValue);
                    }
                }
            });

            return "local value";
        }
        else
        {
            // Return the string from cache as they are present there
            return this.Cache.GetFilename(key);
        }

Note: this.Cache represents a cache object.

The application is a web application on .net 3.5.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about changing the delegate to look like this:

var cacheValue = operation();
lock (this.Cache)
            {
                if (!this.Cache.Contains(key))
                {
                    // Perform the operation to get value for cache here

                    this.Cache.Add(key, cacheValue);
                }
            }

This kind of coding locks the dictionary for a very short time. You can also try using ConcurrentDictionary that mostly doesn't to any locking at all.

Alex.

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Yes I think its a better option to move the position of the lock to just the adding to cache. This will also handle the situation where the same key may be added twice if the async thread is fired more than once. What do you mean when you say ConcurrentDictionary? –  amateur Dec 7 '10 at 0:06
    
You want to prevent multiple calls to operation() though in case there are cache misses on the same value. eg, If 3 threads need the same value, this solution will call operation() 3 times, while the original solution would only call it once. –  Robert Wagner Dec 7 '10 at 0:09
    
@Nail: ConcurrentDictionary is a collection type that was introduced with .NET 4.0. It's in the System.Collections.Concurrent namespace. –  Jim Mischel Dec 7 '10 at 0:09
    
Thanks Jim but I am using .net 3.5 so dont think its available to me. Left that out of my original question, will include it now. Thanks. –  amateur Dec 7 '10 at 0:11

There are several problems with your code. Problems include: calling Cache.Contains outside a lock while other threads may be modifying the collection; invoking operation within a lock which may cause deadlocks; etc.

Here's a thread-safe implementation of a cache that satisfies all your requirements:

class Cache<TKey, TValue>
{
    private readonly ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, Task<TValue>> items;

    public Cache()
    {
        this.items = new ConcurrentDictionary<TKey, Task<TValue>>();
    }

    public Task<TValue> GetAsync(TKey key, Func<TKey, TValue> valueFactory)
    {
        return this.items.GetOrAdd(key,
            k => Task.Factory.StartNew<TValue>(() => valueFactory(k)));
    }
}

The GetAsync method works as follows: First it checks if there is a Task in the items dictionary for the given key. If there is no such Task, it runs valueFactory asynchronously on the ThreadPool and stores the Task object that represents the pending asynchronous operation in the dictionary. Code calling GetAsync can wait for the Task to finish, which will return the value calculated by valueFactory. This all happens in an asynchronous, non-blocking, thread-safe manner.

Example usage:

var cache = new Cache<string, int>();

Task<int> task = cache.GetAsync("Hello World", s => s.Length);

// ... do something else ...

task.Wait();
Console.WriteLine(task.Result);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but could you explain this line as I dont quiet understand it ->return this.items.GetOrAdd(key, k => Task.Factory.StartNew<TValue>(() => valueFactory(k))); –  amateur Dec 7 '10 at 0:07
    
Will your example work in .net 3.5? Thanks for your help. –  amateur Dec 7 '10 at 0:19
    
this code will not work with .net 3.5, and your expensive async task can still be executed more then once; to guarantee the async task only execute once, combine concurrentDictionary with Lazy<T> –  kite Aug 20 at 4:19

Looks like a standard solution, except for the retrieval in the background thread. It will be thread safe as long as all other bits of the code that use the cache also take out a lock on the same cache reference before modifying it.

From your code, other threads will still be able to read from the cache (or write to it if they don't take out a lock(). The code will only block at the point a lock() statement is encountered.

Does the return "local value" make sense? Would you not need to retrieve the item in that function anyway in the case of a cache miss?

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Thats my fault for confusion - the return "local value" is just to illustrate that a default value will be returned while the other thread is operating. If another thread hits this method with a different key, can it access the cache while the first thread is processing its async call? Also should I include the lock just around the adding to cache rather than the entire operation? To handle a scenario where thread 1 is performing the operation and thread 2 looks for the same key and triggers the async call. –  amateur Dec 7 '10 at 0:04
    
Yes it can. I would keep it the way you have (only include it at the stage you have determined a cache miss) for exactly the reason you have mentioned. –  Robert Wagner Dec 7 '10 at 0:06
    
As long as "local value" makes sense in the context, the user won't get the value that should be in the cache unless they call the method again. Is it a web or windows app? –  Robert Wagner Dec 7 '10 at 0:08
    
What do you mean "cache miss"? And your recommendation is to keep the code like I have in the question even taken in to account the points made in the other questions. –  amateur Dec 7 '10 at 0:09
    
It is a web application and not getting the value in the cache until next call is by design and what I require. –  amateur Dec 7 '10 at 0:09

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