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I want to convert pointers of any type to int in C and C++. The code must be the same for both C and C++. The following program works for C but not for C++.

int main(void)
{
    long long a;
    int b = (int)&a;

    return 0;
}

How can I get it working for C++?

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closed as not a real question by Crazy Eddie, casablanca, Michael Burr, dmckee, R.. Dec 7 '10 at 4:00

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
C++ is backwards compatible with C so anything that works in C works in C++. –  heavyd Dec 7 '10 at 1:18
14  
@heavyd: Not true. –  Loki Astari Dec 7 '10 at 1:20
1  
It doesn't compile and it doesn't give an error message -- weird :) –  Lou Franco Dec 7 '10 at 1:30
1  
You can't do this portably as a pointer may be a larger data type (i.e. more bits) than an int. –  Tony D Dec 7 '10 at 1:30
1  
It is not good to edit a question such that you render the very answer you accepted inapplicable. -1 and vote to close. –  dmckee Dec 7 '10 at 3:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Looks like you want the offsetof macro, it's defined in <stddef.h>.

Edit: You have changed your example, now you should look at intptr_t or uintptr_t which are in stdint.h. Do not, under any circumstances, put an address into a plain int.

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Is it portable and is it supported by all compilers? –  Arjun Singri Dec 7 '10 at 1:28
    
But I want to put it into an int, thats the point. Anyway, intptr_t does not allow me to put a long long* into it. –  Arjun Singri Dec 7 '10 at 1:34
    
Yes, offsetof is specified by C89 and C++98 (and all later revisions). –  Jed Dec 7 '10 at 1:35
1  
It doesn't fit in an int so you can't have that. Show us what you actually want to do with it. –  Jed Dec 7 '10 at 1:36
1  
BTW, I think you misunderstand intptr_t. It is a signed integer type capable of holding an address (of any type). "The following type designates a signed integer type with the property that any valid pointer to void can be converted to this type, then converted back to a pointer to void, and the result will compare equal to the original pointer: intptr_t" –  Jed Dec 7 '10 at 1:53

Did you mean:

struct X
{
        char a;
        long long b;
};

int main(void)
{
        int b[20];
        // C++ requires fixed size of arrays.

        b[(int)(&((struct X*)0)->b) - 8] = 5;
        // This will compile But what you get is not even worth guessing at.

        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is fine too as long as there is a conversion from a pointer to int. But I did mean it for the program I have written. –  Arjun Singri Dec 7 '10 at 1:21
    
@user95281: You changed your code so its hard to know that. Even if there is not a valid conversion your new code will compile. If the pointer is 64 bit and the int is 32 bit it still compiles fine. –  Loki Astari Dec 7 '10 at 1:29

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