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Create a function that can have different argument list.
something like this

void s(int d, double t);
void s(string d, UNIT e);

thanks in advance.
Edit 2:
Okay, when i try it with my class it doesn't work...
here is my base class

class GUIInterface
{
public:
    .....
    virtual void LoadFile(string fileName) = 0;
    virtual void LoadFile(LPCWSTR fileName) = 0;
        ....
};

I get this error.

error C2259: 'GUIButtons' : cannot instantiate abstract class
1>          due to following members:
1>          'void GUIInterface::LoadFile(LPCWSTR)' : is abstract

Okay, in my GUIButtons i override the virtual void LoadFile(string fileName) = 0; but i don't override the second one.
like this

class GUIButtons : public GUIInterface
{
     .....
     void LoadFile(string fileName) { ... }
     ...
}
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1  
Looks fine to me. C++ allows multiple definition of the function s as long as each has a unique set of parameters. –  Loki Astari Dec 7 '10 at 1:31
    
Oh forgot to include something in my post, how about if the functions are virtual and in class –  Ramilol Dec 7 '10 at 1:32
    
@Ramhol - What about it? –  Crazy Eddie Dec 7 '10 at 1:34
    
This problem has nothing to do with overloading. See my amended answer. –  Marcelo Cantos Dec 7 '10 at 1:47
1  
You just need to provide an implementation for the function GUIButtons::LoadFile(LPCWSTR). You made it pure virtual (with = 0, which tells the compiler to insist that derived classes provide their own implementations. –  Tony D Dec 7 '10 at 1:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Function overloading is perfectly legal in C++, as long as the parameters can produce a unique resolution. In the above case, the first parameter will always be sufficient to resolve uniquely to one of the functions.

In a class context, if the member functions are defined in the same class, it works just as it does for free functions.

The one scenario that catches out many C++ novices is with inheritance:

class Foo {
public:
    void s(int d, double t);
};

class Bar {
public:
    void s(string d, UNIT e);
};

// ...

Bar b;
b.s("hello", 42); // Fine
b.s(3, 4.5);      // FAIL

The second call tp b.s won't work, because C++ looks for the first scope that contains the symbol. In this case, it finds Bar::s, and even though Bar::s(string, UNIT) fails the match, C++ won't go and try the base class. Once a scope with the symbol is found, the search stops there and then, regardless of whether a matching function is found at that point.

You can get around this behaviour by explicitly reintroducing the base class symbol in the derived class:

class Bar {
public:
    using Foo::s;
    void s(string d, UNIT e);
};

EDIT: In response to the OP's Edit 2...

The problem you are seeing has nothing to do with overloading. You simply haven't overridden the pure virtual member functions in the derived class GUIButtons. Overriding a base-class function with a matching derived-class function is a different concept to overloading.

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