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I've been using a tool for a while and I like it so much I'd like to have it as an eclipse plugin. Unfortunately, I think it's written in C++. Is there any way such a code base could be used as the basis for a Eclipse plugin without re-writing it in Java?

BTW: the tool is closed source, commercial, maintained by someone else and would need to be used as a GUI widget. I'm mostly wondering if it would be at all likely that I could talk the owners into doing this.

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4 Answers

You could always use JNI

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You could try to create Java wrappers for your C++ code using SWIG (or plain JNI, which is a major PITA though).

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In general, integrating existing native applications and tools into Eclipse is a major effort. If you want to talk the maintainers into doing it, you will have to convince them why porting to Eclipse would be good for them.

However, if there is a suitable C++ API, you can do a lot on your own. You can wrap the API using SWIG, or write a wrapper executable which communicates using some for of serialization protocol, for example Google Protobuf. However, this will not take care of integrating the UI in Eclipse, so if the tool is UI-heavy this will probably not help you much.

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UI heavy would be a bit of an understatement: scootersoftware.com –  BCS Dec 8 '10 at 15:28
    
Exactly what kind of functionality do you want to access from inside Eclipse? From what I can see, Beyond Compare does a lot of things, and some of them may work just as well without integrating it into Eclipse. –  JesperE Dec 9 '10 at 8:11
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Depending on what tool it is, you may consider a few other options. If it is a code generation or translation tool, you may need nothing more than a custom builder, which can invoke the tool as part of the build process with options and targets of your choosing. For example, you can run a Visual Studio build as part of an Eclipse compilation without problems.

Or if it is a graphical tool, check whether it is a COM object, which can be wrapped "easily" into Java and hence into an Eclipse plugin.

And finally, I would also like to put in a vote for SWIG. This stuff is really good and makes it quite easy to wrap C or C++ APIs into Java and generating a ton of JNI code for you.

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