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I'd like to control how much horizontal space a bullet pushes its <li> to the right in an <ol> or <ul>.

That is, instead of always having

*  Some list text goes
   here.

I'd like to be able to change that to be

*         Some list text goes
          here.

or

*Some list text goes
 here.

I looked around but could only find instructions for shifting the entire block left or right, for example, http://www.alistapart.com/articles/taminglists/

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1  
Almost a duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/2441059/… –  rds Jan 9 '13 at 13:54

9 Answers 9

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Put its content in a span which is relatively positioned, then you can control the space by the left property of the span.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>SO question 4373046</title>
        <style>
            li span { position: relative; left: -10px; }
        </style>
    </head>
    <body>
        <ul>
            <li><span>item 1</span></li>
            <li><span>item 2</span></li>
            <li><span>item 3</span></li>
        </ul>
    </body>
</html>
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@Tom Auger, I ask to clarify; What is the additional, non-semantic element used by BalusC? –  itsols Jul 14 '11 at 10:20
    
Just to clarify, the <span> tag can be semantic when it is assigned a class, for instance <span class="tel">123-456-7890</span> is implicitly semantic. –  ingyhere Mar 2 '12 at 2:01
2  
+1 for actually answering the guy's question ;) (though the span should ideally in real life have a class anyway for good practice futureproofing as well as semantics: if in future any javascript or new features development etc had a good reason to add extra spans to your content, things could get messy) –  user568458 Aug 7 '12 at 11:01

To summarise the other answers here – if you want finer control over the space between bullets and the text in a <li> list item, your options are:

(1) Use a background image:

<style type="text/css">
li {
    list-style-type:none;
    background-image:url(bullet.png);
}
</style>

<ul>
    <li>Some text</li>
</ul>

Advantages:

  • You can use any image you want for the bullet
  • You can use CSS background-position to position the image pretty much anywhere you want in relation to the text, using pixels, ems or %

Disadvantages:

  • Adds an extra (albeit small) image file to your page, increasing the page weight
  • If a user increases the text size on their browser, the bullet will stay at the original size. It'll also likely get further out of position as the text size increases
  • If you're developing a 'responsive' layout using only percentages for widths, it could be difficult to get the bullet exactly where you want it over a range of screen widths

2. Use padding on the <li> tag

<style type="text/css">
ul {padding-left:1em}
li {padding-left:1em}
</style>

<ul>
    <li>Some text</li>
</ul>

Advantages:

  • No image = 1 less file to download
  • By adjusting the padding on the <li>, you can add as much extra horizontal space between the bullet and the text as you like
  • If the user increases the text size, the spacing and bullet size should scale proportionally

Disadvantages:

  • Can't move the bullet any closer to the text than the browser default
  • Limited to shapes and sizes of CSS's built-in bullet types
  • Bullet must be same colour as the text
  • No control over vertical positioning of the bullet

(3) Wrap the text in an extra <span> element

<style type="text/css">
li {
    padding-left:1em;
    color:#f00; /* red bullet */
}
li span {
    display:block;
    margin-left:-0.5em;
    color:#000; /* black text */
}
</style>

<ul>
    <li><span>Some text</span></li>
</ul>

Advantages:

  • No image = 1 less file to download
  • You get more control over the position of the bullet than with option (2) – you can move it closer to the text (although despite my best efforts it seems you can't alter the vertical position by adding padding-top to the <span>. Someone else may have a workaround for this, though...)
  • The bullet can be a different colour to the text
  • If the user increases their text size, the bullet should scale in proportion (providing you set the padding & margin in ems not px)

Disadvantages:

  • Requires an extra unsemantic element (this will probably lose you more friends on SO than it will in real life ;) but it's annoying for those who like their code to be as lean and efficient as possible, and it violates the separation of presentation and content that HTML / CSS is supposed to offer)
  • No control over the size and shape of the bullet

Here's hoping for some new list-style features in CSS4, so we can create smarter bullets without resorting to images or exta mark-up :)

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1  
Great answer. For #2 to work, be sure you maintain your list-style-position to outside. –  Tom Auger Aug 14 '12 at 15:04
    
The span element is the fix for me. I +1'ed this answer only because I preferred negative margin to negative absolute positioning - for no good reason. –  FlipMcF Feb 27 '13 at 20:51
    
If you have text that wraps lines I found that I had to add display: block; to the span element for so the wrapped text would line up as well ( I also ended up using anchor tags instead of spans ) –  Kevin M Jun 5 '13 at 15:33

This should do it. Be sure to set your bullets to the outside. you can also use css pseudo elements if you can drop them in IE7 downward. I don't really recommend using pseudo elements for this kinda thing but it does work to control distance.

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html lang="en-US">
<head>
    <title>Test</title>
    <meta charset="UTF-8">
<style type="text/css">
ul {
    list-style: circle outside;
    width: 100px; }
li {
    padding-left: 40px; }

.pseudo, .pseudo ul  {
    list-style: none;
}
.pseudo li { position: relative; }

/* use ISO 10646 for content http://la.remifa.so/unicode/named-entities.html */
.pseudo li:before {
    content: '\2192';
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
}
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <ul>
        <li>Any Browser really</li>
        <li>List item
            <ul>
                <li>List item</li>
                <li>List item</li>
            </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>

    <ul class="pseudo">
        <li>IE8+ only</li>
        <li>List item
            <ul>
                <li>List item with two lines of text for the example.</li>
                <li>List item</li>
            </ul>
        </li>
    </ul>
</body>
</html>
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1  
I can't believe this answer isn't accepted. It's 100% CSS, it doesn't add any superfluous <span> element, and it made me finally understand why there is a inside/outside option ! (and it's the accepted answer of the duplicate question mentioned...) –  MindTailor May 13 '13 at 16:52
    
Using list-style-position: outside and padding on the LI elements allows you to increase the distance between the bullet points but it still doesn't work the other way around beyond a browser specified offset. See this JS Bin. –  Mesagoma Aug 27 '13 at 20:03
1  
Addendum: In modern browsers (IE9+, FF, Chrome, etc.), use a negative text-indent on the <UL> or <LI> to negate the browser enforced distance between bullet point and <LI> content. That is, increase padding-left as shown above to increase the distance and reduce text-indent to reduce the distance between the bullet point and the content as desired. –  Mesagoma Aug 28 '13 at 18:39
    
Alas, for all of the above mentioned desktop browsers, if the contents of an <LI> wraps into a second line, such subsequent lines end up being re-indented based on the margin/padding/indent that we managed to undo for the first line via text-indent. Sigh –  Mesagoma Aug 28 '13 at 19:35
    
another option is to use the :before pseudo elements and set the content to whatever you like. from there position the pseudo elements as desired. –  Thorn007 Aug 30 '13 at 1:22

You can also use a background image replacement as an alternative, giving you total control over vertical and horizontal positioning.

See the answer to this Question

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You can use the padding-left attribute on the list items (not on the list itself!).

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Old question, but the :before pseudo element works well here.

<style>
    li:before {
        content: "";
        display: inline-block;
        height: 1rem;  // or px or em or whatever
        width: .5rem;  // or whatever space you want
    }
</style>

It works really well and doesn't require many extra rules or html.

<ul>
    <li>Some content</li>
    <li>Some other content</li>
</ul>

Cheers!

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It seems you can (somewhat) control the spacing using padding on the <li> tag.

<style type="text/css">
    li { padding-left: 10px; }
</style>

The catch is that it doesn't seem to allow you to scrunch it way-snug like your final example.

For that you could try turning off list-style-type and using &bull;

<ul style="list-style-type: none;">
    <li>&bull;Some list text goes here.</li>
</ul>
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You can use ul li:before and a background image, and assign position: relative and position:absolute to the li and li:before, respectively. This way you can create an image and position it wherever you want relative to the li.

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ul
{
list-style-position:inside;
} 

Definition and Usage

The list-style-position property specifies if the list-item markers should appear inside or outside the content flow.

Source: http://www.w3schools.com/cssref/pr_list-style-position.asp

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This does not answer the question. It asks the method for controlling the size of the indentation. –  Esoteric Screen Name Oct 15 '13 at 19:41

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