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When I declare something like

<div class="t-widget t-treeview t-reset" id="TreeView">

Am I saying that either three classes (i.e. t-widget, t-treeview or t-reset ) apply?

So:

.t-widget
{
   ...
   /* Styles apply */
}

.t-treeview
{
   ...
   /* Styles apply */
}

.t-reset
{
   ...
   /* Styles apply */
}
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1  
You are saying it has every one of the three classes. For instance, I am "human male Caucasian" -- ALL of these classes apply to me. If you ask me if I am any of those classes I will say "true". This is the same as the CSS selectors. Each one will match. Since the "weight" of the selector is the same, the latter ones will override, IIRC. –  user166390 Dec 7 '10 at 3:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To build on slebetmans answer, you can also use combinations of them. so

.widget.treeview { }

would match only elements with both widget and treeview classes

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It just so happened that in my example they were declared for that reason, so your answer applies perfectly. Thank you. –  baron Dec 7 '10 at 3:21
    
I did mention about specificity. The OP did not ask about specificity but rather which of the styles apply which as I said, they all do in sequence. Now, if the OP has further questions about specificity (or is curious about the word since it is very rare in regular English) I would have elaborated only when he asks for it specifically. –  slebetman Dec 7 '10 at 3:26

Yes, they all apply. And since their specificity are equivalent the latter declarations overrides the earlier ones.

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emphasis on ALL, not the "or" the OP was asking. –  AUSteve Dec 7 '10 at 3:18
    
I don't get it. The OP is asking which of the rules apply to which the answer is all, in sequence. Maybe you're better at reading between the lines than I am. –  slebetman Dec 7 '10 at 3:28

yes keep in mind that CSS means cascading styles sheet

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1  
it will be easier to understand by reading this: my.safaribooksonline.com/web-development/css/9780980285857/… –  Eric Fortis Dec 7 '10 at 3:31
<div class="t-widget t-treeview t-reset" id="TreeView">

It mentions that all 3 classes apply in sequence. That is style of t-widget applies first, t-treeview second and t-rest last in this example. IOW the later not only applies later in sequence but also overrides the earlier styles.

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This means that you're getting all the styling from each class and applying it to that element.

The element will revive all of the declared styles if the specificity is right.

You can read some good stuff about that here => http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2010/04/07/css-specificity-and-inheritance/

you can also create selectors like:

.t-widget.t-treeview.t-reset { ... }
.t-widget.t-reset { ... }

The classes you use do not matter as long as they are valid. Elements with the declared classes in combination would receive those styles.

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