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i have two columns in table datetime of our timezone with, taking into account daylight saving time, c flag of summer time. i have the order by to all days (order by datetime), and order by for changing time from summer to winter (order by flag desc, datetime). as result i want see the selection order by datetime but in day of changing time order by flag desc, datetime. can i do that one query without stored procedure, cursors, view?

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3 Answers 3

the select * from a gives me something like this:

2010-03-28 00:47:42 0
2010-03-28 01:27:42 0
2010-03-28 03:17:42 1
2010-03-28 05:20:42 1
2010-03-28 07:20:42 1
2010-10-31 00:35:20 1
2010-10-31 01:10:20 1
2010-10-31 02:04:20 0
2010-10-31 02:05:20 0
2010-10-31 02:07:20 0
2010-10-31 02:09:20 0
2010-10-31 02:10:20 1
2010-10-31 02:13:20 0
2010-10-31 02:18:20 0
2010-10-31 02:20:20 1
2010-10-31 02:40:20 1
2010-10-31 03:24:20 0
2010-12-01 11:08:19 0

i want to see something like this:

2010-03-28 00:47:42 0
2010-03-28 01:27:42 0
2010-03-28 03:17:42 1
2010-03-28 05:20:42 1
2010-03-28 07:20:42 1
2010-10-31 00:35:20 1
2010-10-31 01:10:20 1
2010-10-31 02:10:20 1
2010-10-31 02:20:20 1
2010-10-31 02:40:20 1
2010-10-31 02:04:20 0
2010-10-31 02:05:20 0
2010-10-31 02:07:20 0
2010-10-31 02:09:20 0
2010-10-31 02:13:20 0
2010-10-31 02:18:20 0
2010-10-31 03:24:20 0
2010-12-01 11:08:19 0
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And what exactly is the difference between the two listings???? They look very much the same to me...... –  marc_s Dec 7 '10 at 5:58
    
sorry, i edit some –  Xaver Dec 7 '10 at 6:13

I interpret your example as follows:

Sort by DATE (not time) ascending.
Most days - time asecending
10/31 (and im guessing one day in the spring?) - flag c desc, time ascendng

ORDER BY DATE(datefield), (CASE DATEPART(dy, datefield) WHEN '10/31' THEN c DESC, TIME(datefield) ELSE TIME(datefield) END) 

Where DATEPART(dy, X), is a tsql for date without the year. If i'm wrong, or you wish to make it universal, you can just do CONCAT on MONTH and DAY among other things.

You left some room for interpretation under the 'Most days' case (since in your example all datetimes with the flag are strictly greater than all of those without). but you can change that however you need

(TIME functions make no functional difference since we know dates are equal whenever this comparison matters. i put them for clarity)

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in day of spring all goes normally. i work on microsoft sql server which have not a date() function also syntax of case in 'order by' in t-sql is difficult to understand for me. after the desc in case the end is necessary. the days of changing stored in database (it is just last sunday of november i can not think that expression in t-sql and i create table). can i do query after when? –  Xaver Dec 7 '10 at 6:51

Basically, you need to standardize the time; the ORDER BY clause below removes the hour associated with daylight savings time. If your dst colum is actually a bit, you may need to convert it to a tinyint (either in your design or inline in the ORDER BY clause to make this work.

USE tempdb

DECLARE @T TABLE (dt DATETIME, c tinyint)
INSERT INTO @t 
VALUES ('2010-03-28 00:47:42', 0) 
,('2010-03-28 01:27:42', 0) 
,('2010-03-28 03:17:42', 1) 
,('2010-03-28 05:20:42', 1) 
,('2010-03-28 07:20:42', 1)
,('2010-10-31 00:35:20', 1) 
,('2010-10-31 01:10:20', 1) 
,('2010-10-31 02:04:20', 0) 
,('2010-10-31 02:05:20', 0) 
,('2010-10-31 02:07:20', 0) 
,('2010-10-31 02:09:20', 0) 
,('2010-10-31 02:10:20', 1) 
,('2010-10-31 02:13:20', 0) 
,('2010-10-31 02:18:20', 0) 
,('2010-10-31 02:20:20', 1) 
,('2010-10-31 02:40:20', 1) 
,('2010-10-31 03:24:20', 0) 
,('2010-12-01 11:08:19', 0)

SELECT Dt, c 
FROM @t
ORDER BY DATEADD(HOUR, -c, Dt)
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