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How do I design the database to calculate the account balance?

1) Currently I calculate the account balance from the transaction table In my transaction table I have "description" and "amount" etc..

I would then add up all "amount" values and that would work out the user's account balance.


I showed this to my friend and he said that is not a good solution, when my database grows its going to slow down???? He said I should create separate table to store the calculated account balance. If did this, I will have to maintain two tables, and its risky, the account balance table could go out of sync.

Any suggestion?

EDIT: OPTION 2: should I add an extra column to my transaction tables "Balance". now I do not need to go through many rows of data to perform my calculation.

Example John buys $100 credit, he debt $60, he then adds $200 credit.

Amount $100, Balance $100.

Amount -$60, Balance $40.

Amount $200, Balance $240.

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What are your expected volumes for transactions ? –  iDevlop Dec 7 '10 at 6:37
    
wtf is that question where everyone gets negative points ?? –  iDevlop Dec 7 '10 at 7:14
    
no idea iDevelop, I didn't give anyone a positive or a negative point :), now im confused, one guy says yes, another says no. What is going on! ?? –  001 Dec 7 '10 at 7:18
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The problem with the Balance field in Transactions table, is that you not only build a transitive dependency at row level, which is not "Normal" but you add a transitive dependency at column level, which will be a headache if you ever have a problem (trigger failing or other). My advice is to write down your normalised structure, then write every "Use case" you plan to have, discuss them with others, then review your structure at the light of your use cases to see if some denormalisation is required. Anyway, design stage is crucial, taking your time at that point is not "losing" time! –  iDevlop Dec 7 '10 at 8:11
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"transactions are never deleted from the previous years"...I would thing twice about this. You might consider moving the old transactions to an archive table after some time, + create a special type of transactions (initialBalance) in the active table. That could be part of a yearly process (or any appropriate time frame). And you should include that point in your "Use cases" ;-) –  iDevlop Dec 7 '10 at 8:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 25 down vote accepted

An age-old problem that has never been elegantly resolved.

All the banking packages I've worked with store the balance with the account entity. Calculating it on the fly from movement history is unthinkable.

The right way is:

  • The movement table has an 'opening balance' transaction for each and every account. You'll need this in a few year's time when you need to move old movements out of the active movement table to a history table.
  • The account entity has a balance field
  • There is a trigger on the movement table which updates the account balances for the credited and debited accounts. Obviously, it has commitment control. If you can't have a trigger, then there needs to be a unique module which writes movements under commitment control
  • You have a 'safety net' program you can run offline, which re-calculates all the balances and displays (and optionally corrects) erroneous balances. This is very useful for testing.

Some systems store all movements as positive numbers, and express the credit/debit by inverting the from/to fields or with a flag. Personally, I prefer a credit field, a debit field and a signed amount, this makes reversals much easier to follow.

Notice that these methods applies both to cash and securities.

Securities transactions can be much trickier, especially for corporate actions, you will need to accommodate a single transaction that updates one or more buyer and seller cash balances, their security position balances and possibly the broker/depository.

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"Personally, I prefer a credit field, a debit field and a signed amount, this makes reversals much easier to follow.", why not just have 1 field "Amount" with the sign? –  001 Dec 7 '10 at 17:02
    
"All the banking packages I've worked with store the balance with the account entity." how do they do that extactly? this would produce multiple account records as the balance are updated. Im looking at this diagram right now, databaseanswers.org/data_models/online_banking/index.htm It seems to be incomplete, but if this person was to store the balance information he would store it under the "Balance_history" table (to me this feels more like the right thing to do). –  001 Dec 7 '10 at 17:25
    
From his diagram, ... Transaction table stores the transaction information, including the "amount" field, and the balance history table, stores the updated balance. It feels somewhat right, however not feeling that its completely correct, ie How would I know which transaction was the transaction that affected the balance? –  001 Dec 7 '10 at 17:30
    
@001 "why not just have 1 field "Amount" with the sign?" I don't think you read my answer carefully. I said: "Personally, I prefer a credit field, a debit field and a signed amount" –  smirkingman Dec 7 '10 at 20:18
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@001 Each transaction contains 3 fields. 1/ The ID of the account being debited. 2/ The ID of the account being credited. 3/ The amount, positive=transfer from creditor to debitor, negative=transfer from debitor to creditor (usually a reversal). I suggest you read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Double-entry_bookkeeping_system –  smirkingman Dec 8 '10 at 9:05

You should store the current account balance and keep it up to date at all times. The transaction table is just a record of what has happened in the past and shouldn't be used at a high frequency just to fetch the current balance. Consider that many queries don't just want balances, they want to filter, sort and group by them, etc. The performance penalty of summing every transaction you've ever created in the middle of complex queries would cripple even a database of modest size.

All updates to this pair of tables should be in a transaction and should ensure that either everything remains in sync (and the account never overdraws past its limit) or the transaction rolls back. As an extra measure, you could run audit queries that check this periodically.

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Tell that the peopel coming to audit your bookkeeping. You will be surprised how long they laugh. Every transaction to an account musst be numbered (to maintain an order) and you can just put the new account balance right in there. No need for a second table actually. No performance penalty. Doubles, btw., how bookkeeping is done. Which this is all about. –  TomTom Dec 7 '10 at 6:51
    
@TomTom: now I see your point. Your idea is good. Too bad it was not clearly said in your answer, and too bad your answers look so agresssive ! –  iDevlop Dec 7 '10 at 8:00
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@TomTom, Marcelo's wording is a bit ambiguous, but your comments on auditing are not helpful, nor right. Audit is about establishing correctness and have little to do with optimisation of speed. Marcelo is a bit imprecise because he talks about 'current balance', where in reality most financial systems will keep balances according to account and other analytical dimensions summed up by certain date granularity. Your idea of keeping a running balance on transaction level is useless for any report that would need to filter transactions on anything but attribute that conforms to order of booking. –  Unreason Dec 7 '10 at 8:58

A common solution to this problem is to maintain a (say) monthly opening balance in a snapshot schema. Calculating the current balance can be done by adding transactional data for the month to the monthly opening balance. This approach is often taken in accounts packages, particularly where you might have currency conversion and revaluations.

If you have problems with data volume you can archive off the older balances.

Also, the balances can be useful for reporting if you don't have a dedicated external data warehouse or a management reporting facility on the system.

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Of course you need to store your current balance with each row, otherwise it is too slow. To simplify development, you can use constraints, so that you dont need triggers and periodic checks of data integrity. I described it here Denormalizing to enforce business rules: Running Totals

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Here is would like to suggest you how can you store your opening balance with a very simple way:-

  1. Create a trigger function on the transaction table to be called only after update or insert.

  2. Create a column having name in the master table of account naming Opening Balance.

  3. save your opening balance in array in the opening balance column in master table.

  4. you even not need to use server side language use this store array simply you can use database array functions like available in PostgreSQL.

  5. when you want to recalculate you opening balance in array just group your transaction table with array function and update the whole data in the master table.

I have done this in PostgreSQL and working fine.

over the period of time when your transaction table will become heavy then you can partition for your transaction table on the base of date to speed up the performance. this approach is very easy and need not to use any extra table which can slow performance if joining table because lesser table in the joining will give you high performance.

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hi, I am not clear with no.3. "opening balance" is in the same transaction table or a separate table ? –  Axil Aug 4 at 5:21

Your friend is wrong and you are right, and I would advise you don't change things now.
If your db ever goes slow because of this, and after you have verified all the rest (proper indexing), some denormalisation may be of use.
You could then put a BalanceAtStartOfYear field in the Accounts table, and summarize only this year records (or any similar approach).
But I would certainly not recommend this approach upfront.

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Ah... no, seriously. Accounting isa tricky busines to get right with possibly some hefty legal requirements. Ad hoc summations do not cut it. –  TomTom Dec 7 '10 at 6:53
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Of course they do. –  iDevlop Dec 7 '10 at 7:16

Simple answer: Do all three.

Store the current balance; and in each transaction store the movement and a snapshot of the current balance at that point in time. This would give something extra to reconcile in any audit.

I've never worked on core banking systems, but I have worked on investment management systems, and in my experience this is how It's done.

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This give something extra to reconcile in an audit. Which helps audit the software (in terms of correct calculations and checking if transactions get deleted; and is not requirement=the only way to do it), which where I work is part of an IT audit; but this is not directly related to accounting audit (IT audit is just a part of financial audit). –  Unreason Dec 7 '10 at 9:16
    
Correct, but it's not unlikely with large interoperateing system to encounter situations where certain process (an overnight batch for instance) creates anomalies; a bit of denormalisation, will help ensure that they can be tracked down. –  Dog Ears Dec 7 '10 at 10:18
    
@Unreason - Updated to reflect your comment, thanks. –  Dog Ears Dec 7 '10 at 10:20
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@smirkingman for the benefit of the community what's awful about my advice, for that matter what makes it different from your advice? Seems that we basically suggested the same thing? –  Dog Ears Dec 7 '10 at 23:00
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@dogs ears the awfulness is storing the balance in every movement. More duplicated data and a nightmare to fix when something goes wrong. –  smirkingman Dec 8 '10 at 9:00

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