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I'm currently writing a C#-class in my ASP.NET (3.5) application to handle all database-queries. Some of the methods are there to make a select-query to the database. Inside the method i simply have a SqlDataReader r = command.ExecuteReader(); to fetch the data.

I now want r to be returned by the method, but when i close the database-connection, the datareader closes and the object contains nothing anymore. Thought of putting everything into a string-array, but this is unpractical if i have mixed integer and text-fields in my database. Is there an easy ("premade") way of storing the data in some object to return?

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A DataReader should be used in situations where you DON'T want to get all the data at once. DataTables (and DataSets) are used in situations where you do read the data in one fill. –  Mitch Wheat Jan 12 '09 at 23:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a datatable and SqlDataAdapter:

using(SqlDataAdapter adap = new SqlDataAdapter(cmd))
{
  adap.fill(myDataTable);
}

return myDataTable;
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or use the datatable load method - myDataTable.Load(myReader); –  Russ Cam Jan 12 '09 at 23:47

Have you thought of using Linq or an ORM like subsonic for this

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Typically, the results are either stuffed into a collection or a datatable. Datatables are a little easier from the perspective of not having to instantiate objects and storing them.

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you can just set the commandbehavior to closeconnection. and then when you call r.close the underlying connection will close.

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+1 to counter drive-by downvoter; this is a correct answer for the specific question, but of course the OP is using datareader incorrectly ;-) –  Steven A. Lowe Jan 13 '09 at 1:12

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