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How do I get The quick brown fox. in the following document:

<a>
   <b>
      Hello
      <c/>
      World
   </b>
   The quick brown fox.
</a>
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1  
/a/text()[2] but this solution is not universal, works for this case only. –  khachik Dec 7 '10 at 7:28
    
@khachik, I believe this is incorrect. There is only one child text node of a. –  Yodan Tauber Dec 7 '10 at 7:58
    
@Yodan I'm sorry to ruin your belief about it, but a has two child text nodes - one is the whitespace between <a> and <b> and the second is the text needed to be extracted. –  khachik Dec 7 '10 at 9:35
    
@khachik: Well, at least according to the .NET implementation (of XmlNode.SelectNodes), there is only one node that matches /a/text(). I think it ignores whitespace when there is nothing but whitespace, but includes whitespace when other characters are present. –  Yodan Tauber Dec 7 '10 at 12:51
    
@Yodan DOM, SAX, XPath, XML have their own specifications which don't depend on .NET or another implementations. –  khachik Dec 7 '10 at 12:55
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As discussed in comments, when dealing with mixed content is important to know whether white space only text nodes are being preserved or stripped.

Universal solution:

/a/text()[normalize-space()][1]

Meaning: first not white space only text node child of a root element

Other posibility:

/a/text()[last()]

Meaning: last text node child of a root element

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I'd make that predicate [normalize-space(.) != ''] to make it more explicit. –  Robert Rossney Dec 7 '10 at 18:58
    
+1 for the only correct answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Dec 9 '10 at 3:59
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text() selects all child text nodes of the current node, so /a/text() is the way to go. Just remember that you may need to do some string manipulation on the results, because an XML like this one:

<a>
   <b>
      Hello
      <c/>
      World
   </b>
   The quick <!--comment--> brown fox.
</a>

will return two text nodes ("the quick" and "brown fox"). Also, the text values will contain whitespace (e.g. the newline after </b> and before "the").

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you can start with /a/text() This will get you just the node texts not the tags.

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