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I have an odd question that I have always thought about, but could never see a practical use for. I'm looking to see if there would be enough justification for this.

When is handling a null pointer/reference exception preferred over doing a null check? If at all.

This applies to any language that has to deal with null pointers/references which has exception handling features.

My usual response to this would be to perform a null check before doing anything with the pointer/reference. If non-null, continue like normal and use it. If null, handle the error or raise it.

i.e., (in C#)

string str = null;
if (str == null)
{
    // error!
}
else
{
    // do stuff
    int length = str.Length;
    // ...
}

However if we were not to do the check and just blindly use it, an exception would be raised.

string str = null;
int length = str.Length; // oops, NullReferenceException
// ...

Being an exception, we could certainly catch it so nothing is stopping us from doing this (or is there?):

string str = null;
try
{
    int length = str.Length; // oops, NullReferenceException
    // ...
}
catch (NullReferenceException ex)
{
    // but that's ok, we can handle it now
}

Now I admit, it's not the cleanest code, but it's no less working code and I wouldn't do this normally. But is there a design pattern or something where doing this is useful? Perhaps more useful than doing the straight up, null check beforehand.

The only cases where I can imagine this might be useful is in a multi-threaded environment where an unprotected shared variable gets set to null too soon. But how often does that happen? Good code that protects the variables wouldn't have that problem. Or possibly if one was writing a debugger and wanted the exception to be thrown explicitly only to wrap it or whatnot. Maybe an unseen performance benefit or removes the need for other things in the code?

I might have answered some of my questions there but is there any other use to doing this? I'm not looking for, "do this just because we can" kinds of examples or just poorly written code, but practical uses for it. Though I'll be ok with, "there's no practical use for it, do the check."

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DO NOT ever catch a NullReferenceException. It implies something is very wrong with your code. –  leppie Dec 7 '10 at 8:30
1  
I'm not sure everyone understood the intent of my question, but I'll take from this that it's just never really useful and there's no pattern where it's used. I know the whys we shouldn't do it when there are better ways to handle it, I just wanted to know if there was a good enough reason to do it. But Ignacio and Howie's answers together are a strong enough argument why it isn't done. –  Jeff Mercado Dec 9 '10 at 1:51
    
I'm not at all sure why this was at -1. Upvoted as it's an interesting question, but the answers may well be language and platform-specific. –  scriptocalypse Apr 27 '11 at 23:27

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem is that all null pointer exceptions look alike. Any accounting that could be added to indicate which name tripped the exception can't be any more efficient than just checking for null in the first place.

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If you expect the value to not be null, then there is no point in doing any checks. But when accepting arguments, for example, it makes sense to test the arguments that you require to be non-null and throw ArgumentNullExceptions as appropriate.

This is preferred for two reasons:

  1. Typically you would use the one-string form of the ArgumentNullException constructor, passing in the argument name. This gives very useful information during debugging, as now the person coding knows which argument was null. If your source is not available to them (or if the exception trace was submitted by an end user with no debug symbols installed) it may otherwise be impossible to tell what actually happened. With other exception types you could also specify which variable was null, and this can be very helpful information.
  2. Catching a null dereference is one of the most expensive operations that the CLR can perform, and this could have a severe performance impact if your code is throwing a lot of NullReferenceExceptions. Testing for nullity and doing something else about it (even throwing an exception!) is a cheaper operation. (A similar principle is that if you declare a catch block with the explicit intent of catching NREs, you are doing something wrong somewhere else and you should fix it there instead of using try/catch. Catching NREs should never be an integral part of any algorithm.)

That being said, don't litter your code with null tests in places you don't ever expect null values. But if there is a chance a reference variable might be null (for example if the reference is supplied by external code) then you should always test.

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This a good (balanced) approach to dealing with null objects/pointers. From a C++ standpoint, this article gives an interesting perspective to excessive null checks. Null Pointer Checks - Is it a panacea for software development –  ap-osd Mar 22 at 10:59

I've been programming Java for more than 10 years, and I can't remember a single time I've explicitly tried to catch a null pointer exception.

Either the variable is expected to be null sometimes (for example an optional attribute of an object), in which case I need to test for null (obj.attr != null), or I expect the variable to be not null at all times (in which case a null indicates a bug elsewhere in the code). If I'm writing a method (say isUpperCase) whose argument (String s) is null, I explicitly test for null and then throw an IllegalArgumentException.

What I never ever do, is silently recover from a null. If a method should return the number of upper case characters in a string and the passed argument was null, I would never "hide" it by silently return 0 and thus masking a potential bug.

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+1 I echo this in regards to ActionScript. It's always seemed nonsensical to try to "recover" from a 1009 error because the only way such a thing can happen is a grievous error in logic elsewhere. This practice has served me well in Android Java as well... the only times I ever try to "catch" a NPE are when I'm forced by the method's signature (it's a checked Exception). –  scriptocalypse Apr 28 '11 at 0:13

Personnally (doing C++), unless there is a STRONG contract that assures me that my pointers are not nullptr, I always test them, and return error, or silently return if this is allowed.

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In Objective-C you can safely do anything with nil you can do with a non-nil and the nil ends up being a noop. This turns out to be surprisingly convenient. A lot less boilerplate null checking, and exceptions are reserved for truly exceptional circumstances. Or would that be considered sloppy coding?

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1  
Comparing my experiences with ActionScript 2, which never threw an error under any circumstances and marched merrily along when any kind of operation was performed on a null or undefined value, vs ActionScript 3 which very aggressively kills your swf when you perform an operation on a null, I can say with confidence that debugging in an environment that never complains or alerts you to null operations is an absolute nightmare compared to one that does, and that ignoring the null/undefined check in such a language as AS2 is an invitation to heartache. I would assume the same is true of Obj-C –  scriptocalypse Apr 27 '11 at 23:33

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