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In my ASP.Net application I'm using URL routing.
The url format is somewhat like: http://site/{culture}/project/{id}.

To allow users to visit the login and recovery page, I've added the following entries to my web.config:

<location path="en-GB/login">
  <system.web>
    <authorization>
      <allow users="*"/>
    </authorization>
  </system.web>
</location>

<location path="nl-NL/login">
  <system.web>
    <authorization>
      <allow users="*"/>
    </authorization>
  </system.web>
</location>

<location path="login">
  <system.web>
    <authorization>
      <allow users="*"/>
    </authorization>
  </system.web>
</location>

Is there a form of notation so that I can skip the en-GB part and replace it with a wildcard?
I want the login and recovery page etc. to be available regardless of the culture.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I don't believe you can place relative paths in the root web.config, but that isn't a concern. You can use the support of nested Web.Config files to your advantage.

You can place a web.config file similar to this in any of your sub directories (adjusting to suit the needs of that specific directory) and you'll get the support you seek. It is also a lot easier to maintain as the settings are closer to the code files they control.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>
    <system.web>
      <authorization>
        <deny users="*"/>
      </authorization>
    </system.web>
</configuration>

The overall configuration for authentication types, roles, etc. would be done in the web.config in your applications root directory. As a result, you can't set a separate login page per directory from this method, but you could have a login page that automatically handled a redirect when needed (by analyzing the ReturnURL QueryString value).

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1  
Unfortunately these aren't real directories. I'm using url routing. There is no en-GB or nl-NL folder etc etc –  Zyphrax Dec 11 '10 at 22:18
    
So internally you are using the same files for all locales, but attaching querystring values to determine the locale? –  Frazell Thomas Dec 13 '10 at 2:08
    
I'm using the same file for all locales. There is no querystring, it's done by url routing. –  Zyphrax Dec 13 '10 at 11:12
    
Wouldn't it be easier then to perform the security check at the page/method level? –  Frazell Thomas Dec 13 '10 at 14:17
    
Why is this the accepted answer if it doesn't address the fact that the locale is coming from the URL and that there are no physical 'sub-directories' per locale in which to place the recommended web.config??? –  JTech Mar 19 '14 at 14:12

Looking at this post, you might be able to change the extension of your login page and do something like the following:

<system.webServer>
  <security>
    <requestFiltering>
      <fileExtensions>
        <add fileExtension=".login" allowed="true" />
      </fileExtensions>
    </requestFiltering>
  </security>
</system.webServer>

I have not tried this, but it is perhaps something to attempt.

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