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My Model contains a property named Title, and in my Create view I set the page title using ViewBag.Title.

This creates the following problem: the form generated by Html.Editor will display the text from ViewBag.Title, instead of the model's Title value.

The only workaround I have found is first calling Html.Editor, and then setting the View.Title.

Does anyone have a better solution?

Edit 1: I am using MVC 3.

Edit 2: This is my DisplayTemplates/Object.cshtml:

@model dynamic
@using Iconum.VS10CS040.Library.Web.MVC3.Helpers

@if (ViewData.TemplateInfo.TemplateDepth > 1) {
    <span class="editor-object simple">@ViewData.ModelMetadata.SimpleDisplayText</span>
} else {
    foreach (var prop in ViewData.ModelMetadata.Properties.Where(
            pm => 
                pm.ShowForEdit 
                && !ViewData.TemplateInfo.Visited(pm)      
                && pm.ModelType != typeof(System.Data.EntityState)
                && !pm.IsComplexType             
            )
        ) 
        {
        if (prop.HideSurroundingHtml) {
            <text>@Html.Editor(prop.PropertyName)</text>
        } else {
            string css = "";
            if (prop.Model != null && prop.Model.GetType() != null)
            {
                css += " " + prop.Model.GetType().ToString().ToLower().Replace('.', '-');
            }
            if (prop.DataTypeName != null)
            {
                css += " " + prop.DataTypeName.ToLower();
            }
            if (prop.IsRequired && prop.ModelType.FullName != "System.Boolean")
            {
                css += " required";
            }

            <div class="editor-container @css">
                 <div class="editor-label">
                    @if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(Html.Label(prop.PropertyName).ToHtmlString()))
                    {
                        // Use LabelWithForThatMatchesTheIdOfTheInput instead of Label because of a bug (fixed in MVC 3)
                       @Html.LabelWithForThatMatchesTheIdOfTheInput(prop.PropertyName)
                    }
                    @if (prop.IsRequired && prop.ModelType.FullName != "System.Boolean")
                    {
                        @Html.Raw(" <span class=\"required\">*<span>");
                    }
                </div>
                <div class="editor-field">
                    @* This the line that causes my problem *@
                    @Html.Editor(prop.PropertyName) 
                    @Html.ValidationMessage(prop.PropertyName)
                </div>
            </div>
        }
        } //foreach

    // Loop though all items in the Model with an TemplateHint (UIHint)
    foreach (var prop in ViewData.ModelMetadata.Properties.Where(
           pm => pm.ShowForEdit
           && !ViewData.TemplateInfo.Visited(pm)
           && pm.ModelType != typeof(System.Data.EntityState)
           && !pm.IsComplexType
           && pm.TemplateHint != null
           && (
            pm.TemplateHint == "jWYSIWYG0093"
            ||
            pm.TemplateHint == "jQueryUIDatepicker"
            ||
            pm.TemplateHint == "CKEditor"
           )
           )
       )
    {
        // TODO: check for duplicate js file includes
        @Html.Editor(prop.PropertyName, prop.TemplateHint + "-Script")
    }    

}
share|improve this question
    
FYI: the same "over-aggressive" binding happens in a DisplayFor. –  Frank van Eykelen Dec 7 '10 at 14:35
    
What is View.Title? Did you mean ViewBag.Title? Which version of ASP.NET MVC are you using? Which view engine? –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 23 '11 at 13:31
    
Yes, this is about ViewBag.Title, looks like editor binded to this variable. –  gimalay Jan 23 '11 at 13:39
    
Could you post a sample code allowing to reproduce the issue. I am not able to reproduce it. EditorFor always uses the property of the model. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 23 '11 at 13:43
    
No, this not about EditorFor<>(), this is about Html.Editor(string) method. I use it for forms generation, model property name passed ("Title") as argument, value with same name should be defined in ViewBag. –  gimalay Jan 23 '11 at 13:47

4 Answers 4

I would recommend using EditorFor instead of Editor.

Html.EditorFor(x => x.Title)

instead of:

Html.Editor("Title")

This way not only that the view takes advantage of your view model but it behaves as expected in this case.

Example with ASP.NET MVC 3.0 RTM (Razor):

Model:

public class MyViewModel
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
}

Controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        ViewBag.Title = "ViewBag title";
        ViewData["Title"] = "ViewData title";
        var model = new MyViewModel
        {
            Title = "Model title"
        };
        return View(model);
    }
}

View:

@model AppName.Models.MyViewModel
@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Home Page";
}

@Html.EditorFor(x => x.Title)

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "Some other title";
}

So no matter how much we try to abuse here the editor template uses the correct model title (which is not the case if we used Html.Editor("Title")).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I understand this. I need to make View witch did't know about concrete model type. So it use reflection to get properties names and create editors. You can give me advice how I can generate forms from metadata without Html.Editor(string) method. Or how to avoid binding to ViewBag properties. –  gimalay Jan 23 '11 at 14:31
    
@gimalay, oh I understand now. You may take a look at the following blog post which explains how editor templates are implemented. The Object.ascx editor template shows how you could build a dynamic form assuming that you don't know the model type. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 23 '11 at 15:06
    
This example contains exactly same code which I have. Just Html.Editor(string) calls. –  gimalay Jan 23 '11 at 16:23
    
Thanks, I've found other way how to so this. –  gimalay Jan 23 '11 at 16:28
    
@gimalay: Please share this other way of doing it, because I have now indeed narrowed down the problem to my EditorTemplates/Object.cshtml (also based on Brad Wilson code mentioned above). The @Html.Editor(prop.PropertyName) line binds to the wrong Title, but I can't fix it. When I change it to an Html.EditorFor it won't bind to the right EditorTemplate and value. –  Frank van Eykelen Jan 24 '11 at 10:36

As suggested by the other answers, using EditorFor instead of Editor seems to work around the problem. However, using EditorFor requires knowledge of the model type and property type at compile-time, which isn't the case for Object.cshtml.

You can still do this by building up and calling the correct generically-constructed EditorFor method using reflection. The code to do this is really messy, so here are some re-usable extension methods to do it for you.

Use them like this in Object.cshtml where prop is an instance of ModelMetadata like in the question:

@Html.DisplayFor(prop)
@Html.LabelFor(prop)
@Html.EditorFor(prop)
@Html.ValidationMessageFor(prop)

Here are the extension methods:

using System;
using System.Linq.Expressions;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Web.Mvc;
using System.Web.Mvc.Html;
using System.Web.Routing;

namespace ASP
{
    public static class NonStronglyTypedStronglyTypedHtmlHelpers
    {
        public static MvcHtmlString DisplayFor<TModel>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> html, ModelMetadata prop)
        {
            return StronglyTypedHelper(html, h => h.DisplayFor, prop);
        }

        public static MvcHtmlString EditorFor<TModel>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> html, ModelMetadata prop)
        {
            return StronglyTypedHelper(html, h => h.EditorFor, prop);
        }

        public static MvcHtmlString LabelFor<TModel>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> html, ModelMetadata prop)
        {
            return StronglyTypedHelper(html, h => h.LabelFor, prop);
        }

        public static MvcHtmlString ValidationMessageFor<TModel>(this HtmlHelper<TModel> html, ModelMetadata prop)
        {
            return StronglyTypedHelper(html, h => h.ValidationMessageFor, prop);
        }

        private static MvcHtmlString StronglyTypedHelper(HtmlHelper html, Func<HtmlHelper<object>, GenericHelper<object>> accessMethod, ModelMetadata prop)
        {
            var constructedMethod = MakeStronglyTypedHelper(html, accessMethod, prop);
            var genericPropertyExpression = MakePropertyExpression(prop);
            var typedHtmlHelper = MakeStronglyTypedHtmlHelper(html, prop.ContainerType);

            return (MvcHtmlString)constructedMethod.Invoke(null, new object[] { typedHtmlHelper, genericPropertyExpression });
        }

        private static MethodInfo MakeStronglyTypedHelper(HtmlHelper html, Func<HtmlHelper<object>, GenericHelper<object>> accessMethod, ModelMetadata prop)
        {
            var objectTypeHelper = new HtmlHelper<object>(html.ViewContext, html.ViewDataContainer, html.RouteCollection);
            var runMethod = accessMethod(objectTypeHelper);
            var constructedMehtod = runMethod.Method;
            var genericHelperDefinition = constructedMehtod.GetGenericMethodDefinition();
            return genericHelperDefinition.MakeGenericMethod(prop.ContainerType, prop.ModelType);
        }

        private static object MakeStronglyTypedHtmlHelper(HtmlHelper html, Type type)
        {
            var genericTypeDefinition = typeof(HtmlHelper<>);
            var constructedType = genericTypeDefinition.MakeGenericType(type);
            var constructor = constructedType.GetConstructor(new[] { typeof(ViewContext), typeof(IViewDataContainer), typeof(RouteCollection) });
            return constructor.Invoke(new object[] { html.ViewContext, html.ViewDataContainer, html.RouteCollection });
        }

        private static LambdaExpression MakePropertyExpression(ModelMetadata prop)
        {
            var propertyInfo = prop.ContainerType.GetProperty(prop.PropertyName);
            var expressionParameter = Expression.Parameter(prop.ContainerType);
            var propertyExpression = Expression.MakeMemberAccess(expressionParameter, propertyInfo);
            return Expression.Lambda(propertyExpression, expressionParameter);
        }

        private delegate MvcHtmlString GenericHelper<TModel>(Expression<Func<TModel, object>> expression);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I found partial solution myself.

Just use:

    @Html.EditorForModel()

instead of:

    @foreach (var property in Model.GetMetadata().Properties)
    {
            <div class="editor-label">
                @Html.Label(property.PropertyName)
            </div>
            <div class="editor-field">
                @Html.Editor(property.PropertyName) 
                @Html.ValidationMessage(property.PropertyName)
            </div>

    }

Html.EditorForModel() method return same results, but without described problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Would you mind showing what your EditorTemplates/Object.cshtml looks like after applying this workaround? When I try Html.EditorForModel() in my Object.cshtml template, it seems to ignore all properties and doesn't render anything. Thanks. –  Daniel Liuzzi Apr 14 '11 at 15:59
    
I did't change Object template in any way. –  gimalay May 10 '11 at 10:17
    
If you expect EditorForModel to do a deep traversal of your object graph you need to edit the MVC source code. It will only go 2 layers deep by default (which means only native properties on your view model). –  Chris Marisic Aug 16 '11 at 19:32
    
I think EditorForModel uses Object.cshtml, so this should result in recursive logic, which I think the framework picks up on, resulting in nothing being rendered. Consequently, the use of Editor is removed, and hence the original problem is also removed, but this replaces that problem with a new one: Object.cshtml doesn't work anymore. –  Sam Jul 9 at 6:22

I solve same problem. Use this syntax instead Html.Editor

@(Html.EditorFor(p => property.Model))
share|improve this answer
    
This looked like a good idea at first, but after trying it, I found that it had some problems. It registers the wrong property name (and possibly type) with the framework. This seems to mess various things up, including the generated HTML, model binding, validation, and probably others. –  Sam Jul 9 at 6:18

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