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I have 2 dates in format:

27.12.2007

12.03.2010

Howto print all days ( in cycle ) between this 2 dates ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I know that you've already accepted an answer, but it uses the rather clunky old Date::Calc module. These days, most people would recommend using DateTime instead.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use DateTime;

my %start;
@start{qw[day month year]} = split /\./, '27.12.2007';
my %end;
@end{qw[day month year]} = split /\./, '12.03.2010';

my $start = DateTime->new(%start);
my $end   = DateTime->new(%end);

my $curr = $start;

while ($curr <= $end) {
  print $curr->ymd, "\n";
  $curr->add(days => 1);
}
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Why would you recommend using DateTime instead of Date::Calc? –  eugene y Dec 7 '10 at 12:20
2  
Because the "old-style" date and time modules all do one thing. Most of them do that one thing well, but you have problems if you want to, say, use Date::Calc and Date::Parse together as they have completely different internal representations of dates and times. The DateTime family of modules is an integrated set of modules that are explicitly designed to work together. Once you've switched to using the DateTime modules you'll be able to do pretty much everything you want without having to convert between incompatible representations. –  Dave Cross Dec 7 '10 at 13:05
    
I use DateTime because it's date calculation for grown-ups. Time zones and leap seconds are a must, they reflect the reality of how the world works. Date-Calc's maintainer just does not seem to think this is important. –  daxim Dec 7 '10 at 13:07
    
it's subjective, but I think that DateTime has a much nicer interface than the alternatives - there are a few gotchas, but generally results in easy-to-follow code –  plusplus Dec 7 '10 at 13:31

Use Date::Calc.

use Date::Calc qw(Delta_Days Add_Delta_Days);

my @begin = reverse split /\./, '27.12.2007';
my @end   = reverse split /\./, '12.03.2010';

my $delta = Delta_Days(@begin, @end); 

for my $i (0..$delta) {
    printf "%d-%02d-%02d\n", Add_Delta_Days(@begin, $i);
}   
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