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I know of this jasypt library:

http://www.jasypt.org/index.html

which works great but only provides Hexadecimal or Base64 for the encrypted out.

Neither works for me because Hexadecimal code is too long and Base64 cannot be passed safely on URL or as Javascript parameters. I am looking for something that produce only lower/upper case letters a to z and number 0 to 9. Is there such a library?

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base32, base64, ascii85 depending on what symbols are allowed in the context. base32 is more then normal for URL and javascript. – khachik Dec 7 '10 at 11:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Base32 (RFC). There're also variants of Base64 which replace the troublesome + and / characters: See the Wikipedia article or the RFC.

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Why not URL encode the result from Base64 and transport that?

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I tried URL encoding with base64 but it does not work consistently based on the jaspt libray I am using. Thats why I posted question here. – Alan McCloud Dec 7 '10 at 15:41
    
That is quite strange. Have you tried writing a test case in Java where you first base64 uuencode, uuencode, uudecode and then base64 uudecode and see if you get the same result as you started with? Maybe your problem is on the receiver end (maybe not Java?) – Knubo Dec 7 '10 at 20:01
    
There is also overhead involved in doing url endcoding decoding and there are just a lot of places this is going. If I can find java based encryption library that support alphanumeric encoding, this would simply my problem a lot. So still looking for answer to original question I posted. – Alan McCloud Dec 9 '10 at 12:11

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