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If I have original function (as an example):

var x = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
var y = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }

and I've gone ahead and made this into a self-invoking anonymous JS function, as such:

(function() {
    var x = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
    var y = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
})()

am I doing something paradoxical? I'd like to access x and y as global variables, but the self-invoking anonymous function is useful in other areas that I'm not going into detail right now - I just want to keep it.

Should I be doing something like:

   var  x= (function() {
        var x = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
        var y = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
        // Should I be doing something like
        return x
    })()

or

   var  x= (function() {
        var x = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
        return x
    })()

   var  y = (function() {
        var x = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
        return y
    })()

seems somewhat redundant?

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In your second code-snippet I believe you will be creating a local instance of x and y and so will not be able to access these globally. Missing off var will create global variables. However I'm not sure why you would want to do this without seeing the context. –  El Ronnoco Dec 7 '10 at 12:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure what the goal of al this is, but maybe you could return both functions in an object, like so:

var funcs = (function() {
    var x = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; };
    var y = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; };
    return {x: x, y: y};
})();

funcs.x();
funcs.y();

This is basically what the Module Pattern is about (see for example http://www.adequatelygood.com/2010/3/JavaScript-Module-Pattern-In-Depth).

It's good! Depending on what you need, of course.

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You can:

var x, y;
(function() {
  x = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
  y = function() { alert('tadaaa'); return 1; }
})();
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