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I need something like heredoc in JavaScript. Do you have any ideas for this? I need cross-browser functionality.

I found this:

heredoc = '\
<div>\
    <ul>\
        <li><a href="#zzz">zzz</a></li>\
    </ul>\
</div>';

I think it will work for me. :)

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5  
Duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/805107/… which has some more detailed answers. –  Chadwick May 11 '11 at 22:01
1  
Having to add "\" makes me frown every time. Imho, not having normal syntax for multiline strings is completely unjustified. And they could have added it at any given version, but they did not. –  Lex Podgorny Mar 7 '14 at 5:07

8 Answers 8

No, unfortunately JavaScript does not support anything like heredoc.

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5  
I know but I hope to find heredoc hack :) –  VeroLom Dec 7 '10 at 12:21
    
Something like parse function's comments (but it's not work in ie/firefox)= –  VeroLom Dec 7 '10 at 12:22
2  
Maybe is better to accept the lack of heredoc. –  Dacav Aug 27 '13 at 12:03

You could use CoffeeScript, a language that compiles down to JavaScript. The code compiles one-to-one into the equivalent JS, and there is no interpretation at runtime.

And of course, it has heredocs :)

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21  
The correct answer is no. CoffeeScript and EJS could be used as suggestions. –  alvincrespo Aug 9 '11 at 22:13
2  
CoffeeScript is the correct answer to most JS issues I've encountered. If you write more than a trivial amount of JS (and you value your time and energy) you owe it to yourself to use it. –  Brandon Nov 19 '11 at 13:15
9  
Actually not an answer... –  Petr Peller May 14 '12 at 18:41
5  
I think this is a good answer as it provides an easy way to circumvent the absence of heredoc in javascript. Saved me a lot of time. –  Stofke Dec 11 '12 at 22:24
2  
If you just want a chunk of js but don't want to deal with actually writing it: coffeescript.org and use the "Try Coffeescript" button. –  jcollum Mar 14 '13 at 21:59

Depending on what flavour of JS/JS engine you're running (SpiderMonkey, AS3) you can simply write inline XML, into which you can place text on multiple lines, like heredoc:

var xml = <xml>
    Here 
    is 
    some 
    multiline 
    text!
</xml>

console.log(xml.toXMLString())
console.log(xml.toString()) // just gets the content
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1  
This doesn't work in Chrome. –  Steve Breese Jan 30 at 20:27

How about this:

function MyHereDoc(){
/*HERE
<div>
   <p>
      This is written in the HEREDOC, notice the multilines :D.
   </p>
   <p>
      HERE
   </p>
   <p>
      And Here
   </p>
</div>
HERE*/
    var here = "HERE";
    var reobj = new RegExp("/\\*"+here+"\\n[\\s\\S]*?\\n"+here+"\\*/", "m");
    str = reobj.exec(MyHereDoc).toString();
    str = str.replace(new RegExp("/\\*"+here+"\\n",'m'),'').toString();
    return str.replace(new RegExp("\\n"+here+"\\*/",'m'),'').toString();
}

//Usage 
document.write(MyHereDoc());

Just replace "/*HERE" and "HERE*/" with word of choice.

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2  
do all browsers/engines return the comments in the Function.toString()? that's very clever –  gcb Jun 18 '13 at 0:11
    
Works in Chrome's console –  Omn Jul 9 '13 at 19:57
    
How about IE :) –  CommandZ Mar 19 '14 at 18:44
1  
Won't work if you have a closing comment */ in your heredoc. –  Narigo Oct 10 '14 at 10:04
1  
I would recommend using Nate Ferrero's answer, as his is a more refined and optimised example. Mine uses 3 separate regEx calls and is more of proof of concept. –  Zv_oDD Oct 12 '14 at 23:42

Building on Zv_oDD's answer, I created a similar function for easier reuse.

Warning: This is a non-standard feature of many JS interpreters, and will probably be removed at some point, but as I'm building a script to be only used in Chrome, I am using it! Do not ever rely on this for client-facing websites!

// Multiline Function String - Nate Ferrero - Public Domain
function heredoc (f) {
    return f.toString().match(/\/\*\s*([\s\S]*?)\s*\*\//m)[1];
};

Use:

var txt = heredoc(function(){/*
A test of horrible
Multi-line strings!
*/});

Returns:

"A test of horrible
Multi-line strings!"

Notes:

  1. Text is trimmed on both ends, so any extra whitespace on either end is OK.

Edits:

2/2/2014 - changed to not mess with the Function prototype at all and use the name heredoc instead.

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1  
I would use hereDoc() as my function name, but this code worked fine loading my 40k line log dump into a variable in Chrome's console –  Omn Jul 9 '13 at 20:25
    
Why would you create an instance of a function and access the deprecated property __ proto __? Why not just do Function.prototype.str = function () { ... }? –  John Kurlak Jan 25 '14 at 21:33
    
@JohnKurlak that is even better! I don't think I was aware that was possible when I wrote the answer. –  Nate Ferrero Feb 2 '14 at 12:26
2  
@NateFerrero - Awesome answer, thanks! Added an extension of my own as a separate answer. –  Andrew Cheong Feb 14 '14 at 20:59
    
On my Android, nexus 4, running 5.0.1, this no longer works on Chrome. For some reason, it is deleting whitespace and comments. I can't figure out if this is a setting, but it is definitely on the client side. Any ideas for a workaround? –  MLU Dec 29 '14 at 16:16

I feel bad writing a separate answer for merely an extension to @NateFerrero's answer, but I don't feel editing his answer is appropriate either, so please upvote @NateFerrero if this answer was useful to you.

tl;dr—For those who wish to use block comments inside their heredoc...

I mainly needed Javascript heredocs to store a block of CSS, e.g.

var css = heredoc(function() {/*
    /**
     * Nuke rounded corners.
     */
    body div {
        border-top-left-radius: 0 !important;
        border-top-right-radius: 0 !important;
        border-bottom-right-radius: 0 !important;
        border-bottom-left-radius: 0 !important;
    }
*/});

As you can see however, I like to comment my CSS, and unfortunately (as hinted by the syntax highlighting) the first */ ends the overall comment, breaking the heredoc.


For this specific purpose (CSS), my workaround was to add

.replace(/(\/\*[\s\S]*?\*) \//g, '$1/')

to the chain inside @NateFerrero's heredoc; in complete form:

function heredoc (f) {
    return f.toString().match(/\/\*\s*([\s\S]*?)\s*\*\//m)[1].replace(/(\/\*[\s\S]*?\*) \//g, '$1/');
};

and use it by adding a space between the * and / for "inner" block comments, like so:

var css = heredoc(function() {/*
    /**
     * Nuke rounded corners.
     * /
    body div {
        border-top-left-radius: 0 !important;
        border-top-right-radius: 0 !important;
        border-bottom-right-radius: 0 !important;
        border-bottom-left-radius: 0 !important;
    }
*/});

The replace simply finds /* ... * / and removes the space to make /* ... */, thereby preserving the heredoc until called.


You can of course remove the comments altogether using

.replace(/\/\*[\s\S]*?\* \//g, '')

You can also support // comments if you add them to the chain:

.replace(/^\s*\/\/.*$/mg, '')

Also, you can do something other than the single space between * and /, like a -:

    /**
     * Nuke rounded corners.
     *-/

if you just update the regex appropriately:

.replace(/(\/\*[\s\S]*?\*)-\//g, '$1/')
                          ^

Or maybe you'd like an arbitrary amount of whitespace instead of a single space?

.replace(/(\/\*[\s\S]*?\*)\s+\//g, '$1/')
                          ^^^
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2  
Cool! That was a known limitation with my method, I like it :) –  Nate Ferrero Mar 21 '14 at 17:46

You can use Sweet.js Macros to add it like so, as created by Tim Disney in this post

Note that this approach uses backticks as the string delimiters instead:

let str = macro {
    case {_ $template } => {
        var temp = #{$template}[0];
        var tempString = temp.token.value.raw;
        letstx $newTemp = [makeValue(tempString, #{here})];
        return #{$newTemp}
    }
}

str `foo bar baz`
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Try ES6 String Template, you can do something like

var hereDoc = `
This
is
Multiply
Line
String
`.trim()


hereDoc == 'This\nis\Multiply\Line\String'

=> true

you can use this great feature today by 6to5

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