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Edit: Actually this is not unexpected behaviour, but I still need a solution. findpeaks compares each element of data to its neighboring values.

I have data which contains peaks which I detect with the function findpeaks from the Signal Processing Toolbox. Sometimes the function seems not to detect the peaks properly, when I have the same value twice next to each other. This occurs very rarly in my data, but here is a sample to illustrate my problem:

>> values

values =

   -0.0324
   -0.0371
   -0.0393
   -0.0387
   -0.0331
   -0.0280
   -0.0216
   -0.0134
   -0.0011
    0.0098
    0.0217
    0.0352
    0.0467
    0.0548
    0.0639
    0.0740
    0.0813
    0.0858                  <-- here should be another peak
    0.0858                  <--
    0.0812
    0.0719
    0.0600
    0.0473
    0.0353
    0.0239
    0.0151
    0.0083
    0.0034
   -0.0001
   -0.0025
   -0.0043
   -0.0057
   -0.0048
   -0.0038
   -0.0026
    0.0007
    0.0043
    0.0062
    0.0083
    0.0106
    0.0111
    0.0116
    0.0102
    0.0089
    0.0057
    0.0025
   -0.0025
   -0.0056

Now the findpeaks function only finds one peak:

>> [pks loc] = findpeaks(values)

pks =

    0.0116


loc =

    42

If I plot the data, it becomes obvious that findpeaks misses one of the peaks at the location 18/19 because they both have the value 0.08579.

alt text

What is the best way to find those missing peaks?

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4 Answers 4

If you have the image processing toolbox, you can use IMREGIONALMAX to find the peaks, after which you can use regionprops to find the center of the regions (if that's what you need), i.e.

bw = imregionalmax(signal);
peakLocations = find(bw); %# returns n peaks for an n-tuple of max-values

stats = regionprops(bw,'Centroid');
peakLocations = cat(1,stats.Centroid); %# returns the center of the n-tuple of max-values
share|improve this answer
    
The problem wasn't that I only detected one peak, but that I didn't detect the high peak at all. –  Lucas Dec 7 '10 at 14:16
    
@Lucas: Yes, that wasn't formulated very well, and the filtering solution is not guaranteed to fix the problem, so I've removed it. Anyway, imregionalmax does what you want, except it also works if there are more than 2 equal values. You still might want to filter first to remove local maxima that are due to noise. –  Jonas Dec 7 '10 at 14:23
    
imregionalmax does indeed seem to work. I still probably use my own function. –  Lucas Dec 7 '10 at 14:38
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This is an old topic, but maybe some are still looking for an easier solution to this (like I did today):

You could also just substract some very small fixed value from all values on a plateau, except from the first value. This causes each first value on a plateau to always be the highest on the respective plateaus, causing them to be included as peaks.

Just make something like this part of your code:

peaks = yourdata;
verysmallvalue = .001;
plateauvalue = peaks(1);

for i = 2:size(peaks,1)
    if peaks(i) == plateauvalue
        peaks(i) = peaks(i) - verysmallvalue;
    else
        plateauvalue = peaks(i);
    end
end

[PKS,LOCS] = findpeaks(peaks);
plot(yourdata);
hold on;
plot(LOCS, yourdata(LOCS), 'Color', 'Red', 'Line', 'None', 'Marker', 'o');

Hope this helps!

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Use the second derivative test instead?

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I ended up writing my own simpler version of findpeaks, which seems to work for my purpose.

function [pks,locs] = my_findpeaks(X)      
    M = numel(X);
    pks = [];
    locs = [];
    if (M < 4)
        datamsgid = generatemsgid('emptyDataSet');
        error(datamsgid,'Data set must contain at least 4 samples.');
    else
        for idx=1:M-3
            if X(idx)< X(idx+1) && X(idx+1)>=X(idx+2) && X(idx+2)> X(idx+3)
                pks = [pks X(idx)];
                locs = [locs idx];
            end

        end

    end
end

Edit: To clarify, the problem arose, when I had a peak which was exactly between two sample points and those two sample points had coincidentally the same value. It only happend a couple of times in more than 10.000 cases.

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I cannot see how X(idx+1)> X(idx+1) ever evaluates to true. There must be a typo somewhere. –  Jonas Dec 7 '10 at 14:27
    
@Jonas: Yeah, sorry you are right. I took an older version, because I added some things that where specific to my problem. And it contained the mistakes. –  Lucas Dec 7 '10 at 14:34
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