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I have a string containing pairs of characters and I would like to replace each run by a single character. How can I do that?


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3 Answers 3

(This is the official perlfaq answer, minus any subsequent edits)

You can use the substitution operator to find pairs of characters (or runs of characters) and replace them with a single instance. In this substitution, we find a character in (.). The memory parentheses store the matched character in the back-reference \g1 and we use that to require that the same thing immediately follow it. We replace that part of the string with the character in $1.

s/(.)\g1/$1/g; # 5.10 or later
s/(.)\1/$1/g;  # earlier versions

We can also use the transliteration operator, tr///. In this example, the search list side of our tr/// contains nothing, but the c option complements that so it contains everything. The replacement list also contains nothing, so the transliteration is almost a no-op since it won't do any replacements (or more exactly, replace the character with itself). However, the s option squashes duplicated and consecutive characters in the string so a character does not show up next to itself

my $str = 'Haarlem';   # in the Netherlands
$str =~ tr///cs;       # Now Harlem, like in New York
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When did that g (in \g1) slip in there? It's not in the POD for 5.12.1 but I can see it in github. Is it a future (5.13+) thing? –  Michael Carman Dec 7 '10 at 15:43
3  
The \g construct was introduced in 5.10.0. From perl5100delta: A new syntax \g{N} or \gN where "N" is a decimal integer allows a safer form of back-reference notation as well as allowing relative backreferences. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 7 '10 at 16:00
    
There is no need, beyond REQUIRING 5.10, to use that over \1 in this answer. –  MkV Dec 7 '10 at 16:59
    
@MkV, There is a reason that \gN and \g{N} were added to the language. The original way had the mis-feature that it is nearly identical to how you would enter an Octal escape. Since this document is mostly for new Perl programmers, it makes perfect sense to show them the safer way first. –  Brad Gilbert Dec 9 '10 at 20:07
$str=~ s/(.)\1+/$1/g;
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This is the answer from perlfaq4 from the last stable release:

How do I remove consecutive pairs of characters?

(contributed by brian d foy)

You can use the substitution operator to find pairs of characters (or runs of characters) and replace them with a single instance. In this substitution, we find a character in (.). The memory parentheses store the matched character in the back-reference \1 and we use that to require that the same thing immediately follow it. We replace that part of the string with the character in $1.

s/(.)\1/$1/g;

We can also use the transliteration operator, tr///. In this example, the search list side of our tr/// contains nothing, but the c option complements that so it contains everything. The replacement list also contains nothing, so the transliteration is almost a no-op since it won't do any replacements (or more exactly, replace the character with itself). However, the s option squashes duplicated and consecutive characters in the string so a character does not show up next to itself

my $str = 'Haarlem';   # in the Netherlands
$str =~ tr///cs;       # Now Harlem, like in New York
share|improve this answer
    
If possible it would be great for the author to post the answer himself (i.e. brian should post his new answer from stable or master). –  Ether Dec 7 '10 at 18:22
2  
@Ether and @MkV brian and I are posting these questions using stackoverflow.com/users/532928/perlfaq using the version available on faq.perl.org The questions are posted using the perlfaq account so that we do not gain rep from them and answers are marked CW so that it is easier to improve answers. I do not see much of a point in posting almost identical versions of the answers (for rep gain) instead of editing the existing one. –  Sinan Ünür Dec 7 '10 at 19:40
    
@Sinan: ok, I misunderstood; I was under the impression that there was a radically different answer for some questions in blead than the "officially published" version. If the differences are subtle I agree with simply editing the existing response. –  Ether Dec 8 '10 at 17:15

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