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I apologize if "link" is not the exact term for this in advance.

I have a table with user info, (user&password). I need the same user:password pair to appear in another table in the same database. the second table needs to copy the first one at all times - if an entry is deleted from the first one, or added - the changes must apply to the second table instantly.

Please, I need an example of how this can be done, as I do not know the terminology to search on google..


I only need two columns to be a duplicate, not the entire table.

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I'm with Unreason on this - why do you want to maintain duplicate information? Adding to and deleting from a second copy, instantly, doesn't appear to serve any purpose. –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 13:23
    
I just explained that at Unreason's post –  DreamWave Dec 7 '10 at 13:25
    
I think you are looking for foreign keys. Add a foreign key referencing the first table to the second table with correct cascading options and that's all you need. It is not acceptable to duplicate any data in this case. In case of MySQL you will have to use InnoDB storage engine for this to work (MyISAM doesn't support database integrity features such as foreign keys). –  Richard Knop Dec 7 '10 at 15:16

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A view may work, depending on the constraints imposed by your existing system, and those imposed by views. It saves duplicating data:

CREATE TABLE web_users (username VARCHAR(255), password VARCHAR(255));

CREATE VIEW forum_users AS SELECT username, password FROM web_users;

INSERT INTO web_users VALUES ('user1', 'password1');

SELECT * FROM forum_users;
+----------+-----------+
| username | password  |
+----------+-----------+
| user1    | password1 |
+----------+-----------+

INSERT INTO forum_users VALUES ('user2', 'password2');

SELECT * FROM forum_users;
+----------+-----------+
| username | password  |
+----------+-----------+
| user1    | password1 |
| user2    | password2 |
+----------+-----------+

SELECT * FROM web_users;
+----------+-----------+
| username | password  |
+----------+-----------+
| user1    | password1 |
| user2    | password2 |
+----------+-----------+
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if this works, it means you rock.. I'll try it right now –  DreamWave Dec 7 '10 at 13:45
    
It may do - but be sure to check out the rather long list of caveats in the Updatable and Insertable Views documentation! –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 13:53

This can be accomplished with triggers.

The real question is why would you want to have duplicate information in the database.

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1  
+1 for questioning duplicate information. –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 13:20
    
One table consists of my website's users, the other table belongs to a forum (CMS) that I'm implementing inside of the website. I need the user:pass of my website and the forum to match at all times. –  DreamWave Dec 7 '10 at 13:24
    
Why not just use the same table for both? If you can read from one to update the other, access doesn't seem to be an issue. –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 13:26
    
The names of the table columns for the forum are different from the ones I use in my website. Both are complete products and changing every single appearance of "username" (as a name of a column) would take a lot of time.. –  DreamWave Dec 7 '10 at 13:29
    
Ah, I see. This is just an idea off the top of my head, but a view to replace one of the tables might be a better alternative. It depends on the limitations of MySQL views and whether or not you can drop one of the tables and replace it with a view. –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 13:36

The term in mysql is called foreign key.

You would need a innodb storage engine for this to work

details: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/innodb-foreign-key-constraints.html

However using natural key as foreign key has some drawbacks,
this question has been discussed before: How to choose my primary key?

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I don't think foreign key constraints are particularly relevant to the question. Is it not a trigger that is required? –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 13:20
    
hmm..open for discussion, trigger sound reasonable, but factor in key duplicate, natural key issue, i would thinking using foreign key will be more clean-cut –  ajreal Dec 7 '10 at 13:28
2  
@Mike, foreign keys can be realised as triggers; and in this case it could fit - even though the requirements for FK are that there is a unique index on columns referred in the order they are referred to - this will produce artificial constraint (one which is always satisfied, due to unique names which wastes space and possibly makes updates a bit slower); otherwise it would be 1-1 table, with one table as lead with CASCADE UPDATE (and possibly CASCADE DELETE) it could achieve the same result as trigger. It is not very elegant (suggest actual relationship) or flexible, but it should work. –  Unreason Dec 7 '10 at 14:47
    
@Unreason: Thanks for the explanation - it's an interesting idea. –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 14:50
    
@ajreal: I stand (well, sit) corrected. :-) –  Mike Dec 7 '10 at 14:51

An effective way to implement such a requirement is via a database trigger.

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use storage engine as INNODB in mysql and do the indexing in it

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