Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to convert for instance "A\r\nB\tC\nD" to "A\\r\\nB\\tC\\nD" in C(++)?

Ideally using standard library only and a bonus upvote for both pure C and pure C++ solutions.

share|improve this question
    
what is the original string held in? And are the \r/\n for example characters (i.e. 0x0D and 0x0A) or character sequences (i.e. \ followed by n)? –  Nim Dec 7 '10 at 14:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Of course, replace char with wchar_t and std::string with std::wstring if you're using wide character strings.

std::string input(/* ... */);
std::string output;
for(std::string::const_iterator it = input.begin(); it != input.end(); ++it)
{
    char currentValue = *it;
    switch (currentValue)
    {
    case L'\t':
        output.append("\\t");
        break;
    case L'\\':
        output.append("\\\\");
        break;
    //.... etc.
    default:
        output.push_back(currentValue);
    }
}

You can do this in C but it's going to be more difficult because you don't know the buffer size in advance (Though you can make a worst case guess of 2 times the size of the original string). I.e.

//Disclaimer; it's been a while since I've written pure C, so this may
//have a bug or two.
const char * input = // ...;
size_t inputLen = strlen(input);
char * output = malloc(inputLen * 2);
const char * inputPtr = input;
char * outputPtr = output;
do
{
    char currentValue = *inputPtr;
    switch (currentValue)
    {
    case L'\t':
        *outputPtr++ = '\\';
        *outputPtr = 't';
        break;
    case L'\\':
        *outputPtr++ = '\\';
        *outputPtr = '\\';
        break;
    //.... etc.
    default:
        *outputPtr = currentValue;
    }
} while (++outputPtr, *inputPtr++);

(Remember to add error handling to the C version for things like malloc failures ;) )

share|improve this answer
    
That's why I was hoping for some library function; but thanks. –  mbq Dec 7 '10 at 14:38
    
@mbq: Then just use the C++ version; I've been using it for years and know it doesn't have bugs :) (Hell, if you're in C++ then you are using std::string, right? :) ) –  Billy ONeal Dec 7 '10 at 14:41
    
@Bill Sure, unless I have to mess with C ones because of interacting some other code and the problem is simple, like strlen. –  mbq Dec 7 '10 at 15:37
    
@mbq: Huh? I don't understand. –  Billy ONeal Dec 7 '10 at 15:38
    
@Bill Like for instance you get one C-string from one C library and want to check its size before passing it to other C-string using library -- here conversion to std::string only to get length is an overhead. Such stuff happens with low level GUIs and networking. –  mbq Dec 7 '10 at 15:59

Here is something I came up with...

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

inline char needs_escaping(char val) {
        switch(val) {
                case '\n': return 'n';
                case '\r': return 'r';
                case '\t': return 't';
        }
        return 0;
}

char *escape_string(char *in) {
        unsigned int needed = 0, j = 0, length = strlen(in), i;
        for(i = 0; i < length; i++) {
                if(needs_escaping(in[i])) needed++;
        }

        char *out = malloc(length + needed + 1);
        for(i = 0; i < length; i++) {
                char escape_val = needs_escaping(in[i]);
                if(escape_val) {
                        out[j++] = '\\';
                        out[j++] = escape_val;
                }
                else {
                        out[j++] = in[i];
                }
        }
        out[length + needed] = '\0';    
        return out;
}

int main() {
        char *in  = "A\r\nB\tC\nD";
        char *out = escape_string(in);
        printf("%s\n", out);
        free(out);
        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for interesting solution using array indexes instead of pointers (though if you use this in real code please amortize the strlen calls -- no need for order n-squared time complexity for a method like this). –  Billy ONeal Dec 7 '10 at 14:26
    
@Billy ONeal: I was already working on it :) fixed. –  Daniel Sloof Dec 7 '10 at 14:29

I doubt there's any standard library function that does this directly. The most efficient way would be simply to iterate over the input buffer character by character, conditionally copying into an output buffer, with some special state-machine logic to handle '\', etc.

I'm sure there are ways to do this with various combinations of strchr() et al, but it will probably be less efficient in the general case.

share|improve this answer

I would create a lookup table of 32 const char* literals, one for every control code (ASCII 0 to ASCII 31). I would then iterate over the original string, copying non-control chars (ASCII >= 32) to the output buffer and substituting values from the lookup table for ASCII 0--31.

Note 1: ASCII 0 is obviously special for C strings (not so for C++.)

Note 2: The lookup table would contain C escape sequences for codes that have them (\n, \r etc) and backslash plus hex/octal/decimal codes for those that don't.

share|improve this answer

Here's an algorithm in C#. Maybe you can treat it like pseudo-code and convert it to C++.

public static string EscapeChars(string Input) { string Output = "";

foreach (char c in Input)
{
    switch (c)
    {
        case '\n':
            Output += "\\n";
            break;
        case '\r':
            Output += "\\r";
            break;
        case '\t':
            Output += "\\t";
            break;
        default:
            Output += c;
            break;
    }                
}
return Output;

}

share|improve this answer
    
This algorithm doesn't work. \n for example, is not going to be converted, because \n doesn't actually have a slash in the source string. This will turn "\\n" into "\\\\n" instead. –  Billy ONeal Dec 7 '10 at 14:24
    
I respectfully beg to differ. I actually ran this before I posted. Just tried with \\n as Input and it works as expected - it outputs \\n not \\\\n. The switch...case statement ensures that double-slashes aren't included in the output, because the current character (c) has to be an "escape character". –  Bob Black Dec 7 '10 at 14:29
    
@Bob: But that's my point. The input is not "\n", it's a newline character, which doesn't have a slash. Example program: pastebin.com/M2b1Mv4w –  Billy ONeal Dec 7 '10 at 14:34
    
Disclaimer - I ran this as C#, which I probably have no business doing since this was a C++ question. ;-) –  Bob Black Dec 7 '10 at 14:34
    
@Bob: The link I posted was C# as well -- it's wrong in either language. –  Billy ONeal Dec 7 '10 at 14:36

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.