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I'm using Cucumber to send in JSON to some API actions. In one instance, I need to know the ID of an object that was built prior to the API call and pass that ID in.

I want to do this:

  Scenario: Creating a print from an existing document
    Given I am logged in as "foo@localhost.localdomain"
      And I have already built a document
     When I POST /api/prints with data:
       """
       {
         "documentId":"#{@document.id}",
         "foo":"bar",
         "etc":"etc" 
       }
       """
     Then check things

Which doesn't work, because the """ string doesn't interpolate variables like a double-quoted string would. The I have already built a document step builds the @document object, so I don't know ahead of time what my ID will be. If it matters, I'm using MongoDB with mongoid, and my efforts to manually set an ID have proven fruitless.

Is there a clean way to accomplish this?

Environment:

ruby: 1.8.7
rails: 3.0.1
cucumber: 0.9.4
cucumber-rails: 0.3.2
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Do here-documents (see web.njit.edu/all_topics/Prog_Lang_Docs/html/ruby/…) work in Cucumber? I can't find a reliable source on this so I'm leaving it as a comment for now... –  Platinum Azure Dec 7 '10 at 15:09
    
No, they don't. –  jdl Dec 7 '10 at 15:17
    
Well, that's unfortunate. :-( –  Platinum Azure Dec 7 '10 at 15:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Change to ERB syntax (<%= ... %>), and then in your step definition, run the string through ERB:

require 'erb'

When %r{^I POST (.+) with data:$} do |path, data_str|
  data = ERB.new(data_str).result(binding)
  # ...
end
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That is beautiful. Thanks! –  jdl Dec 7 '10 at 15:16
    
Oh, no. Beautiful it ain't, but glad you like it. I would prefer to solve the problem by making a custom step, something like "When I POST /api/prints with the current document" and then build the POST data in the step definition. Having the variable in the scenario feels very hackish. –  Theo Dec 7 '10 at 18:41
    
Hey Theo, see my response below. I don't think @document in the scenario is dirty - it makes the step flexible and combinable with other steps provided they set @document. And while ERB is nice, why not stick with the simple syntax if you can get away with it ? –  Dean Radcliffe Dec 7 '10 at 19:28
    
Because a feature is meant to be read, and to simple to follow, so that you can understand what is meant to happen. Mixing in things like literal JSON blobs, not to mention variable expansion (with variables not even mentioned in the other steps!) is very much the opposite of making the tests readable. If you want to write your acceptance tests that way you might as well use code all the way (and there's nothing wrong with that, it's just mixing the two that gets messy). Hiding the details is what Cucumber is good at. Reading that test all I can think is "where did @document.id come from?" –  Theo Dec 7 '10 at 20:24
    
@document comes from a crazy object graph and its creation is not relevant to the API test. I like to keep things clean and readable as well, but I have a good reason for doing it this way. You guys both gave good answers, and I gave +1 for both. I like the ERB way better, but Dean's way looks good too. –  jdl Dec 7 '10 at 20:33

ERB is one way to defer evaluation, but perhaps, Theo, this is a little cleaner ?

The two halves of this are the scenario side:

Scenario: Creating a print from an existing document
  Given I am logged in as "foo@localhost.localdomain"
    And I have already built a document
  When I POST /api/prints with data:
   # outer, single quotes defer evaluation of #{@document}
   '{
     "documentId":"#{@document.id}",
     "foo":"bar",
     "etc":"etc" 
   }'
 Then check things

And the step definition side:

When %r{^I POST (.+) with data:$} do |path, data_str|
  # assuming @document is in scope...
  data = eval(data_str)
  # ...
end
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I edited your correction for you. –  jdl Dec 7 '10 at 20:29

I would recoment using scenario outlines and examples using something like

Scenario Outline: Posting stuff
....
When I POST /api/prints with data:
   """
   {
     "documentId": <document_id>,
     "foo":"bar",
     "etc":"etc" 
   }
   """
Then check things

Examples: Valid document
| document_id |
| 1234566     |

Examples: Invalid document
| document_id |
| 6666666     |

in it. That would make it clear where it came from at least. Check Substitution in Scenario Outlines here http://cukes.info/step-definitions.html

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