Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Basically I want to do this:

public interface A {
    void a();
}
public interface B {
    void b();
}
public class SomeClass {
    public SomeClass(<A&B> e) { // Note the type here
        e.a();
        e.b();
    }
}

What I did on the commented line is obviously illegal. I know I can just require the passed object to implement interface A, or interface B, but is there a way to do both?

I guess there are workarounds (like requiring the parameter to be of type A and then check if it is also an instanceof B), but that way I don't get help from the compiler. Do you know of any way to do this? Or maybe a smarter workaround...

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can do it with generics enabled. For example, to accept an instance of some class that implements both CharSequence and Appendable:

  public <T extends CharSequence & Appendable> void someMethod(T param) {
    ...
  }
share|improve this answer
2  
This feels messy since you still need to define a type T which implements both A and B. Why not just make that the paramater type? If many objects implement A and B why not make an interface C : A, B? –  Joseph Daigle Jan 13 '09 at 14:00

Depending on the design, you can do one of the following:

  1. Make A : B or B : A.
  2. Make an interface C : A, B.

Either way you'll want to have contract that includes both a() and b().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but the inheritance option doesn't always make sense (A and B could be totally unrelated. I don't really like the second option either, because it means that 1) I might have to make 'C interfaces' for every possible combination of interfaces and 2) classes should all implement these... –  Jordi Jan 13 '09 at 8:13
    
Like I said, it depends on the design. If A and B were related then 1) would work. 2) Really sin't so bad though. A anb B are somewhat related because you're passing in an object that implements both. What about a base class that implements both? –  Joseph Daigle Jan 13 '09 at 13:59

Well, there is the <T extends A & B> f(T ab) notation, but you should favour composition over inheritance. You don't really have to extend anything. Just make a type that is the joint union (product) of both types A and B, as follows:

public abstract class P2<A, B> {
  public A _1();
  public B _2();
}

Sometimes called a product-2, or a "pair" type. You can create a handy constructor for these:

public final class P {
  private P() {}
  public static <A, B> P2 p(final A a, final B b) {
    return new P2<A, B>() {
      public A _1() {
        return a;
      }
      public B _2() {
        return b;
      }
    }
  }
}

Note that you can use the same object for both arguments, if A and B are interfaces and your object implements both of them:

P2<A, B> both = P.p(o, o);

Or you're free to use two different objects, making the design nice and decoupled.

You'll find this type, as well as products of up to 8 types, included in the Functional Java library. There's also a type called Either<A, B> that is the disjoint union (sum) of two types, such that it holds a value that is of either type A or B (or both).

share|improve this answer

Just shooting in the dark, I don't know if this is the correct syntax, ie if you have to redeclare the methods in C but what about this:

public interface A {
    void a();
}
public interface B {
    void b();
}

public interface C extends A, B{}

public class SomeClass{
    public SomeClass(C e) { // Note the type here
      e.a();
      e.b();
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
This requires classes to extend C if their values need to be used as parameters here. A type isn't a subtype of an interface just by implementing the correct methods; it must be explicitly marked. –  Jay Conrod Jan 13 '09 at 3:47
    
You are right that this does require classes to extend C which also means they've extended A and B. I was under the impression that this was supposed to be class SomeClass that had a method that required a variable type of another class that implemented both A and B. So I created C for that contract –  scottm Jan 13 '09 at 4:49

If you have a method that needs two different interfaces as parameters, just make it take two parameters.

public void foo(A a, B b) {
    ....
}

It’s not that hard, believe me.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.