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This might be lame, but here:

public interface Interface<T>
{
    T Value { get; }
}

public class InterfaceProxy<T> : Interface<T>
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

public class ImplementedInterface: InterfaceProxy<Double> {}

Now I want to create an instance of the ImplementedInterface and initialize it's members.

Can this be done somehow like this (using initialization lists) or the same behavior can only be achieved using the constructor with Double argument?

var x = new ImplementedInteface { 30.0 };
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Definitely not lame, nice question. +1 –  Gabe Dec 7 '10 at 16:27

8 Answers 8

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Can be done by:

var x = new ImplementedInteface { Value = 30.0 };
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You missed the round brackets after class name. –  Marcel Gheorghita Dec 7 '10 at 16:26
2  
@Marcel Gheorghita, you can skip this bracket. no need. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 7 '10 at 16:27
    
@Marcel - those are optional. –  Gabe Dec 7 '10 at 16:28
1  
If using a parameterless constructor, it's been optional since object initialization was introduced. –  Brian Ball Dec 7 '10 at 16:31
1  
@Marcel Gheorghita, no marcel, as Brian said, It comes with object initialization, if you have resharper, offers to remove this brackets. –  Saeed Amiri Dec 7 '10 at 16:35
var x = new ImplementedInterface() { Value = 30.0 };
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The only way to achieve what you're after is if your class implements IEnumerable<T> and has an Add method:

public class MyClass : IEnumerable<double>
{
   public void Add(double x){}
}

Then you can do:

MyClass mc = new MyClass { 20.0 };

Obviously that's not what you want, because that doesn't set your Value and it allows you to add multiple values:

MyClass mc = new MyClass { 20.0, 30.0 , 40.0 };

Just go with the standard object initializes like others have pointed out:

var x = new ImplementedInterface() { Value = 30.0 };
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You should be able to do:

var x = new ImplementedInterface {Value = 30.0};
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var instance = new ImplementedInterface { Value = 30.0 }; will work. However, this isn't really the same set of operations as C++ initializer lists -- this is an object initializer. It initializes the new instance via the default constructor and then invokes the property setters for each property.

In other words, the object is constructed before the property setters run. If you want the values for the properties set before construction of ImplementedInterface completes, you'd have to write a constructor, as you noted. This distinction in behavior usually doesn't matter, but it's good to be aware of.

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I am not sure if you have a special reason to use the interfaces that way but the following code might work for you.

public class ImplementedInterface2 : List<double> { }

 public class test
    {
        public void x()
        {
            var x = new ImplementedInterface2() { 30.0 };
        }
    }
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var x = new ImplementedInterface { Value = 30.0 };
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You can definitely use an initialization list, but you have to specify what 30.0 is (this is true for any initialization list, not just the code you have):

var x = new ImplementedInteface { Value=30.0 };
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