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So, lets say I have a method that contains an annotation like so:

@Override
public void bar(String x)

If I were to add Javadoc comments to this snippet of code, which is the preferred method?

Either:

/**
* @param x A string lol
*/
@Override
public void bar(String x)

Or:

@Override
/**
* @param x A string lol
*/
public void bar(String x)
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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

First one. The annotation applies to the method, not the comment. It's also what most IDEs will do, so is the most common anyway.

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Thanks bro - this helps :) Usually people are lazy and look for reason not to add comments, this kind of confusion is sometimes the reason. It's great to have one way of putting it to advocate. –  Bohdan Dec 28 '13 at 0:18

Personally, I prefer the former (i.e. annotation "touching" the method signature), since then it's code with code.

But either works for the compiler, so it's down to personal taste/your organisation's coding standards.

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Opinion: The first method is preferable. In a way the annotation and the method belongs together stronger than the comment.

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Generally annotations are pit on the line (or lines) immediately before the method. Annotations can be a bit long to put on the same line.

However, @Override is a bit special. It's effectively making up for the language not having override. Conventionally it is placed on the same line (although you'll see plenty of examples where it isn't).

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