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For example, 6 => [1,1,0]

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3  
This isn't clear. An int is bit-addressable. Do you mean "print out" the bit pattern? –  egrunin Dec 7 '10 at 17:42
2  
Can you be more specific about what you mean by "bit representation?" –  nmichaels Dec 7 '10 at 17:43
1  
I think he means the binary representation. –  Jacob Relkin Dec 7 '10 at 17:43
    
yes. corrected the title –  tomer Dec 7 '10 at 17:43
    
Is it homework? C already uses binary representation. Do you mean how to get to it? –  ruslik Dec 7 '10 at 17:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

To read bits you can use

char get_bit(unsigned int n, int bit_num){
    if (bit_num < 0 || bit_num >= sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT)
        return -1;
    return (n >> bit_num) & 1;
};

Its main problem is that it's not fast, but OP didn't even specified if he wanted numers or digits.

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I like this answer: nice and simple, and probably even optimizes into a native bit test instruction. However, a few little nitpicks: 1.) char is unsigned on some architectures, so returning -1 would likely yield 255 on those architectures, 2.) Returning a char usually isn't much better than returning an int due to C's tendency to promote things, and 3.) If I were me, I'd probably just assert(bit_num >= 0 && bit_num < sizeof(unsigned int) * CHAR_BIT); rather than having to document the "garbage out" when there is "garbage in". –  Joey Adams Dec 7 '10 at 18:08
    
@Joey: well, it's a sample for a programmer that will use and refractor the code according to his/her needs, and not to be put into library :) –  ruslik Dec 7 '10 at 18:14
unsigned x = number;
char buf[sizeof(int)*CHAR_BIT+1], *p=buf+sizeof(buf);
for (*--p=0; x; x>>=1) *--p='0'+x%2;
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Why not '0'|x%2? –  ruslik Dec 7 '10 at 18:27
    
You at least should use + instead of | for pure portability, since '0' is not guaranteed to be even. x&1 and x%2 are 100% identical for unsigned operands so it's purely a matter of preference. –  R.. Dec 7 '10 at 18:32
1  
@R.: then '0'+x%2. The idea was to get rid of parentheses. –  ruslik Dec 7 '10 at 18:38
    
nod I like that. –  R.. Dec 7 '10 at 19:17

I don't know but I'd make something like

int[32] bits = {};
int     value = 255;
int     i = 0;

while (value)   
{
  bits[i++] = value & 1;
  value = value >> 1;
}
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1  
I wonder what happens passing value=-1 to your code :-) –  6502 Dec 7 '10 at 17:49
    
@6502: a small infinite loop followed by a segmentation fault, I suppose. –  ruslik Dec 7 '10 at 17:51
    
It will return an array full of 1s. –  Paulo Santos Dec 7 '10 at 17:53
    
@ruslik, it won't enter in an infinite loop. Remember how the shift works. –  Paulo Santos Dec 7 '10 at 17:54
1  
the standard does not specify what right shift to use for signed values. AFAIK, x86 compilers uses arithmetic shift. Declare value as unsigned to avoid it. –  ruslik Dec 7 '10 at 17:56

A simple and fast way is to use an unsigned integer as a "cursor" and shift it to advance the cursor:

1000000000000000
0100000000000000
0010000000000000
0001000000000000
0000100000000000
0000010000000000
0000001000000000
0000000100000000
...

At each iteration, use bitwise & to see if the number and the cursor share any bits in common.

A simple implementation:

// number of bits in an unsigned int
#define BIT_COUNT (CHAR_BIT * sizeof(unsigned int))

void toBits(unsigned int n, int bits[BIT_COUNT])
{
    unsigned int cursor = (unsigned int)1 << (BIT_COUNT - 1);
    unsigned int i;

    for (i = 0; i < BIT_COUNT; i++, cursor >>= 1)
        out[i++] = (n & cursor) ? 1 : 0;
}
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