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In my JAVA program, i have this "if" condition :

    if(  (!pccoNettNoAff && !transOPCVM && !garantie) 
      && (  (pccoCourant == null) 
         || (  (pccoCourant != null && rBale.getPcco() != null) 
            && (  (pccoCourant.getId() != rBale.getPcco().getId()) 
               || (  pccoCourant.getId() == rBale.getPcco().getId() 
                  && tauxCourant!=null && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=null 
                  && rBale.getPartenaire()==null 
                  && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=tauxCourant
                  )
               )      
            )
         )
      )
   {

We can translate this in logic by :

Legend : T=true and F=False : They are the result of each test

((T) AND ((F) OR ((T) AND ((F) OR (F)))))

So my final result is obviously False (the Eclipse debug mode find the same result) But my program is going trough this "if" anyway.
I have really not ideas why this is happening, maybe there is some sort of limitation in a "if" condition ??

If anyone have any ideas, please help me :)

Regards,

Cytemax

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2  
Just an observation: this would be much easier to debug if you refactored that boolean expression into smaller chunks. –  eldarerathis Dec 7 '10 at 17:48
5  
Thank god you had that legend. Otherwise, I might have thought that T=pizza –  Falmarri Dec 7 '10 at 17:49
    
How the hell can you be certain that all those nested conditions evaluate to ((T) AND ((F) OR ((T) AND ((F) OR (F))))) –  Falmarri Dec 7 '10 at 17:50
1  
Is these a real code or just exercise? –  Stas Kurilin Dec 7 '10 at 17:51
2  
because you are using the short circuiting operators, (condA || (!condA && condB)) can be shortened to (condA || condB). that should simplify the if statement a little (pccoCourant != null and ...getId() == ....getId() can be removed) –  lijie Dec 7 '10 at 18:01

7 Answers 7

I know why it's happening - because that is far too complicated for an in-line condition.

Refactor that code into a method (or possibly several), whereby you can put things on multiple lines, add temporary variables etc., and it will become much clearer both what it is meant to do, and why it isn't doing it. Something like the following:

private boolean shouldBeActedOn(PCCO pccoCourant) {
   if (pccoCourant != null) {
      return true;
   }
   final PCCO balePcco = rBale.getPcco()
   if (balePcco != null) {
       // etc.
   }
   ...
}

// Then later, where your current block is:

  if (shouldBeActedOn(pccoCourant, otherArgs)) {
     ...
  }

Rest assured, Java's if statements work correctly.

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10  
Actually, if hasn't worked since JDK 1.4. I kept waiting for someone else to notice. –  Alex Miller Dec 7 '10 at 17:52
4  
Ah, I would have noticed but I've been using !unless(...) instead. –  Andrzej Doyle Dec 7 '10 at 17:52

One idea: don't have such a ridiculous number of conditions in a single statement.

You've got virtually no chance of working out what's going on here without simplifying it. Extract subexpressions into separate local variables, and then make the if condition just combine those local variables.

That way you've got a much better chance of working out what's going on. Chances are you've misinterpreted the debugger somewhere...

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If .getId() returns a String, the == and != may not work the way you think - it will test whether they are the same instances, not whether they are equal strings. Look into String.equals().

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No, the Id is a long so the == and != work. –  Cytemax Dec 8 '10 at 13:03
    
But my other condition != of two Double value was wrong ^^ –  Cytemax Dec 8 '10 at 13:36
    
I must use this (rBale.getTauxCcf().compareTo(tauxCourant))!= 0 instead of rBale.getTauxCcf() != tauxCourant. They are both of type Double and not double.I thinks that's a common mistake so tks for putting me on the wright track. –  Cytemax Dec 8 '10 at 13:40
    
@Cytemax - glad to help, even if it was indirectly. But also please consider the other great answers about complexity and readability and their techniques for making code easier to read and maintain in the future - your future self will thank you :-) –  Bert F Dec 8 '10 at 14:08

Not a direct answer to your question, but I'll echo what others have said. First and foremost, simplify your conditional logic; perhaps reduce via boolean algreba rules (if the branching is too complex).

Reminds of me karnaugh maps in school.

I like to define local variables for each separate, smaller condition so that I can combine them into essentially a single If statement. Each boolean value can call out to a separate function for improved legibility.

boolean isTrainingDue( int numDaysLeft ) {

  boolean trainingDue = false;
  boolean isNewUser = (userService.daysSinceSignUp() < 30);
  boolean gracePeriodExpired = (userService.daysLeft() < 1);
  boolean notCertified = 
        !ObjectUtils.isEmpty(p.getExpiredDate()) && 
         ObjectUtils.isEmpty(p.getCertifiedDate());  

  if (isNewUser && notCertified && gracePeriodExpired)
    trainingDue = (numDaysLeft <= 30);

  return trainingDue;       
}
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I agree with the posts by others, but aside from that, you just didn't structure the logic in an easily read way. Here is my attempt and making sense of this long predicate condition:

if(
    !pccoNettNoAff
    && !transOPCVM
    && !garantie
    && (
        pccoCourant == null
        ||
        pccoCourant != null
        && rBale.getPcco() != null
        && (
            pccoCourant.getId() != rBale.getPcco().getId()
            ||
            pccoCourant.getId() == rBale.getPcco().getId()
            && tauxCourant!=null
            && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=null
            && rBale.getPartenaire()==null
            && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=tauxCourant
        )      
    )
)
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UPDATED

OK, I was flat out wrong on this one--missed some -parentheses...

Anyhow, I think Bert F is onto something...

You're checking to see if things (pccoCourant and rBale.getTauxCcf()) are not null, implying they are object references.

You then check to see if they are the same (using ==).

You probably want to check to see if they are EQUAL:

 if( 
(!pccoNettNoAff && !transOPCVM && !garantie) 
&& ( 
    (pccoCourant == null) 
        || ( 
            (pccoCourant != null && rBale.getPcco() != null) 
            && ( 
                (pccoCourant.getId() != rBale.getPcco().getId()) 
                || (
                    pccoCourant.getId() == rBale.getPcco().getId() 
                    && tauxCourant!=null && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=null 
                    && rBale.getPartenaire()==null 
                    && ! rBale.getTauxCcf().equals(tauxCourant)
                )
            )      
    )
)
 ){

You can ignore the rest of this:

Aside from the complexity mentioned by the others, you have some ambiguity in your later conditions:

 if( 
(!pccoNettNoAff && !transOPCVM && !garantie) 
&& ( 
    (pccoCourant == null) 
        || ( 
            (pccoCourant != null && rBale.getPcco() != null) 
            && ( 
                (pccoCourant.getId() != rBale.getPcco().getId()) 
                || (pccoCourant.getId() == rBale.getPcco().getId() 
                && tauxCourant!=null && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=null 
                && rBale.getPartenaire()==null 
                && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=tauxCourant)
            )      
    )
    )
 ){

The innermost nested conditions are lumping an OR with the ANDS at the same level. I suspect what you want is:

 if( 
(!pccoNettNoAff && !transOPCVM && !garantie) 
&& ( 
    (pccoCourant == null) 
        || ( 
            (pccoCourant != null && rBale.getPcco() != null) 
            && ( 
                (pccoCourant.getId() != rBale.getPcco().getId()) 
                || (
                    (pccoCourant.getId() == rBale.getPcco().getId() 
                    && tauxCourant!=null && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=null 
                    && rBale.getPartenaire()==null 
                    && rBale.getTauxCcf()!=tauxCourant)
                )
            )      
    )
)
 ){
share|improve this answer
1  
there's no difference between the two code fragments (you simply doubled the number of parentheses around the final clause), right? –  lijie Dec 7 '10 at 18:27
1  
You're right! The nested stuff has my eyes bugging out too... –  Matthew Flynn Dec 7 '10 at 18:35
    
Lol tks anyway ;) –  Cytemax Dec 8 '10 at 13:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Tks for all your answers

I just transform my condition in several if and it seems to work perfectly ;)

So yes my first condition was too hard for one single line "if" condition ^^

Tks again

I must use this (rBale.getTauxCcf().compareTo(tauxCourant))!= 0 instead of rBale.getTauxCcf() != tauxCourant. They are both of type Double and not double.I thinks that's a common mistake so tks for putting me on the wright track.

Regards,

Cytemax

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